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I've narrowed down my coices to one of three mig welders. It'll either be the Lincoln Weldpak 155 or the Weldpak 100 at Home Depot, or the Craftsman mig welder at Sears. The Weldpak 155 is a 220 volt machine but that's no problem, I can plug it into my dryer outlet. The Weldpak 100 and the Craftsman machines are 110 volt. (didn't check duty cycles) I'd like to solicit some opinions from you guys. Which would be better, The machine with a 220 volt or 110 volt input? The Lincoln machines would require the additional purchase of the mig conversion kit, but I'm really interested in hearing opinions on the 220/110 volt pros and cons. That's pretty much what I'm trying to decide. Thanks guys.
 

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I have the 155 its a great machine . I probaly dont use it as often as you will. I would almost be tempted to get the 110 machine if I had to do it over ( atleast in my situation ). The problem i find is if you want to take it somewhere finding 220 is sometimes a problem. If you buy the 100 or 155 I would get the gas kit when you get it Mike

[This message has been edited by BULKSS (edited 09-27-99).]
 

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If you are not going to be doing mostly frames and hitches (heavy welding), I would stick to the 110v because you can move it around, take it out to where you need it to other peoples houses, out to the project or run it in the field with a generator. Go with the mig setup, it blows away the flux core wire (smoke and splatter).
I have a Hobart Mig and love it.
Happy welding.
 

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I have a Lincoln Weldpak 100, it is compact, light, portable, and can be converted to mig w/ a kit, which I have. I haven't changed over yet , but plan on it soon. You get a much cleaner weld w/ less splatter. The conversion kit cost me @ $89.00 so I went ahead and bought it.If you have any major welding planned, you will need a bigger unit, but for now, this one suits me just fine.
 

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I have used the 110 and the 220 and I love the 220, You need heat to get any penatration, the 110 just don't get hot enough, If you are doing exhuast then going 110, if you are doing trailers, or like me roll cages and frame supports, go 220 or you will be sorry. I would also get the gas kit, well worth the extra $200. You can make some clean welds with the gas on.

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Heres my advice, test out a friends home-depot bought lincoln, century, or sears welder then goto a real welding supply store and demo a hobart/miller 220volt mig, which has been properly setup and you will be convinced that hobart is far far far superior to anything you can buy at home depot, sears, price club, etc. The thing is, you will also be paying twice as much but when it comes to welders you get what you pay for.. the lincoln 155 will do a decent job for little oddball stuff but if you want a good tool that you will have for years, and want to do quality welds, go with a hobart or miller from a real welding supply store.. all welders are not created equal!!!

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Mike Reeh
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Randy I have a 110 I would sell you,then go buy a name brand 220.I should have bought it in the first place.It will weld heavy stuff as well as light,a 110 will only weld light gauge up to 1/8".For what its worth...FRED
 

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I have the Lincoln 100 at work without gas. It's hard to make a clean weld with penetration. If you buy the 155 you can dial down the voltage if needed, but I can't turn up mine. And get the gas kit. Richard
 

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I have a 110 Volt MIG for bodies and light work - it is small and portable - easy to find power (plug in anywhere), and does what it is made for.
I also have a 220 volt, 250 amp stick welder for hitches and heavy work. Based on what I have welded over the last 15 years, if I had to pick only one of these, it would be the 110 MIG hands down. Most home type work is light guage unless you build trailers or the like !

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Gotta have a Chevy !In Durham N.C.
 

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Randy, call LINCOLN and find their nearest supply house seller. I found out from LINCOLN that the machines they sell to home depo are not as good because the buy in a large quanity, get a cheeper price. Buying direct from a Lincoln supply might be a few dollars more but it is a better machine.Also if you plan on doing a lot of heavy duty welding get thr gas bottle attachment.

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BILL TIRELLI TEAM CHEVELLE MEMBER#280 1969 BLK CHEVELLE SS396 375HP 4SP 410 POSI
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Priced out the Lincoln WeldPak unit locally then went to a local welding supply. They gave me just as good a price on a Lincoln SP-125. A commercial quality unit, infinite heat and wire speed settings, 125 AMP and stil 110 Volt/20 AMP. Their advice was avoid the WeldPak and go with the SP line for better quality components. Their opinion was that the SP units are as good as a Hobart. They sell all 3 models.
 

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The Hobart Handler is one to stay away from.
When shopping for a 110 unit for my work the old timer from the supply house who repairs them said they have a longer duty cycle and a little more capabilities but they burn up quicker than the others . We have a miller 110 unit at work . The miller machine is a real nice welder If you decide to go to a welding supply house instead of Home depot look at the Millers . Also I did not know there was a difference in Lincons from Home depot ones to the supply house ones.
If i were to do it over again I would buy from a supply house. I think if you have a problem you will make out better. The place I got the Miller let us Use stop buy and us try out a bunch of different machines Mike
 

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Are you sure you can plug it into your dryer outlet? I think the dryer outlet is 30 amp and ive seen some welders are 50 amp, at least in my old house it was like that. Best check it out first if you decide to go that way.
Ron

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Not the best idea. 50 amps through a 30 Amp circuit (probably 10 guage wire) is a fire waiting to happen. One other thing... Electric dryer circuits are usually dual voltage - 110 VAC for the light and 220 VAC for the element and motor. Just an FYI...MK

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Im sure you can do heavier work with the 220 volt model, but does anyone have a 220 that you can crank down low enough to do sheetmetal and bodywork, or do you really need 2 different machines? I currently have an offbrand mig that I have had for 10 years for sheetmetal (definately not a quality piece but I bought before I knew much about welding) and a lincoln stick AC/DC for heavy stuff. I would like to get one mig that can do both, but is that possible??

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Randy
It just amases me how everyone has a different opinion about welders
Mine is right and everyone else is wrong just kidding
I have been a welding supply salesman for 13 years and a welder for at least 10 years before I started selling the stuff
So let me try and help you out. Most of the post have good info for you.The way to tell about the home dep[ot welder is by the weight of the machine. You will notice the weight of the sp line vs the weldpak is heveir(sp) this is better
I personally have the Hobart Handler 120 it is a 110v and does everything including frames that I need to do on my elky
This gets a little complicated because they have a new handler that is not as good as the 120, but miller bought out hobart and their millermatic 130 is basically the same machine as the old hobart 120.
If you purchase a 220 volt welder you can turn them down enough to do sheet metal
I would look at the new lincoln wirematic 255
it has a lot of features that the other ones do not have built in tool box, gun rest and I think its is priced pretty decent.
I sell all of the major brands and it really comes down to personal preference I would stay away from the imports they are hard to get parts and service for.
If I can help answer any questions please e-mail me

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks guys. I think I'll visit a supply house tomorrow to see if I can find something between a commercial machine and the Homer Depot units. I've used commercial type machines in the past, both Millers and Hobarts. Of course those machines belonged to former employers. I'm looking for a machine to do my body work, but I may want to use it on heavier jobs occasionally. I've reconsidered my decision and will look for an upgrade from the Home Depot machines. Thanks again.
 
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