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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've never seen these before, and they sure are inexpensive compared to other "high-carbon" steel drill bits. Are these for boring holes in wood only, or are they good for metals too?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
ok thanks guys. The website I saw them on didn't specify what they were for. At those cheap prices I kinda suspected they weren't for metal.
 

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A good forstner bit will cut aluminum with no problem, slow speed is the key. Same goes for carbide saw blades. I cut aluminum with my table saw all the time.
 

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A good forstner bit will cut aluminum with no problem, slow speed is the key. Same goes for carbide saw blades. I cut aluminum with my table saw all the time.
I agree. :thumbsup:

I've made a lot of counterbore holes in aluminum with those bits.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
A good forstner bit will cut aluminum with no problem, slow speed is the key. Same goes for carbide saw blades. I cut aluminum with my table saw all the time.
I agree. :thumbsup:

I've made a lot of counterbore holes in aluminum with those bits.
Well guys, FWIW, these are the ones I saw. I don't know if they're all created equal, but I originally was considering using one of these on aluminum.....

https://www.rockler.com/rockler-hig...imperial-sizes-1-4-to-2-1-8-lengths-3-8-shank
 

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Those would probably have no problem cutting into an aluminum intake, I'd use a slow speed and cutting oil like Tap Magic or something similar, maybe drill a pilot hole first with a regular steel bit
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Those would probably have no problem cutting into an aluminum intake, I'd use a slow speed and cutting oil like Tap Magic or something similar, maybe drill a pilot hole first with a regular steel bit
I hear ya Rick. Cutting oil, yes. I don't think they make Tap Magic anymore. I think it was banned by the EPA. We used to have it in the shop I work in, but that was a long time ago. That stuff would practically melt away aluminum. :D

I believe it was the same stuff that Dry cleaners used to use to clean clothes, (Trichorethane 1.1.1. ). If the Tap Magic brand name is still around, I bet it isn't the same stuff at all.
 

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I use forstner bits all the time when I build stair systems. As others have stated, they are for drilling holes in wood and are 10x better than using a paddle pit when you are shooting for a certain depth. Plus, they are very accurate. I use 1 1/2” bits and put a 1 1/2” plug in and give it a light tap and it’s almost flush. Paddle bits suck for doing finish work.

They will work great on aluminum at a very slow speed and use oil to prevent galling.
 

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Those would probably have no problem cutting into an aluminum intake, I'd use a slow speed and cutting oil like Tap Magic or something similar, maybe drill a pilot hole first with a regular steel bit
Forstner bits will make their own pilot hole. All you need is a little tap with a fine punch to center it.
 

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Billy, aluminum cuts well with WD 40, or even kerosene. Amazon had a mis priced sale on Tap Magic once, and I got a case of the small squirt cans for the single can price.
 

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I've drilled a lot of holes in wood for plumbing pipes over the years with my forstner wood bits and one sure wouldn't be my choice to try to use on any metal.

Using a 1/2" HD drill, drilling overhead and hit a nail and it will almost break an arm if you are not careful.

I hate to think what would happen trying to drill metal with one.
I'd use a hole saw.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I've drilled a lot of holes in wood for plumbing pipes over the years with my forstner wood bits and one sure wouldn't be my choice to try to use on any metal.

Using a 1/2" HD drill, drilling overhead and hit a nail and it will almost break an arm if you are not careful.

I hate to think what would happen trying to drill metal with one.
I'd use a hole saw.
Couldn't use a hole saw since it wasn't a through hole I needed. It was aluminum removal of an intake manifold inside the thermostat orifice passage way. But I have it taken care of now. I had to drill and tap a hole on the front face of the manifold to use for the bypass fitting anyway, so with the 23/32 drill bit I used for that, I just kept going deeper with it to take out most of what was left of the internal dividing wall that I wanted to get rid of.
 

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I've never seen these before, and they sure are inexpensive compared to other "high-carbon" steel drill bits. Are these for boring holes in wood only, or are they good for metals too?
Yep ...wood and I've got about 60 of em right here cept I cant post a picture of em for some unknown reason
 

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are you clicking in the paperclip link? what happens?
 

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I hear ya Rick. Cutting oil, yes. I don't think they make Tap Magic anymore. I think it was banned by the EPA. We used to have it in the shop I work in, but that was a long time ago. That stuff would practically melt away aluminum. :D

I believe it was the same stuff that Dry cleaners used to use to clean clothes, (Trichorethane 1.1.1. ). If the Tap Magic brand name is still around, I bet it isn't the same stuff at all.
Billy, the northeast, and Mass in particular, are extreme about EPA concerns. There are many lubrication products excluded from sale in MA.
 
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