Team Chevelle banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good afternoon all
My big block conversion is along the way - probably 1 year into it and still plugging away. If I buy 1 part towards the conversion per week, I'm happy. Anyway, the 307 has a 5/16" diameter straw. This by no means will be enough even for the most mild mannered big block.(conservatively, I would estimate the built 461 on my engine stand at 525-550 HP) I imagine a 3/8" line will suffice, however, if later on down the line more HP or Nitrous are in the works, a 1/2" line may be better off to do up front. The frame is on the car and will stay on - this is a mild, frame on resto. I have seen 1/2" Aluminum line in Summit and/or Jeg's. Do you flare these lines the same way as conventional tubing? Thoses braided steel jobs are probably overkill financially. Lastly, is the fuel feed line from the tank 5/16", or 3/8"? i.e.; would I need a new pipe/fitting on the tank?
Thanks all and sorry about the lengthy post.
Ron

P.S. I now know it's not the engine, or trans or rear end that'll kill ya during the conversion, financially. It is EVERY thing else - brackets, shrouds, headers, pulleys, belts, radiator, screws, chemicals, bushings, headliners, emblems, brake cable, HD starters, SFI flexplates, column redos, etc..., etc..., etc..., etc... etc...But I hear the sound of impending big block WOT in my daytime dreams

[This message has been edited by ron70 (edited 06-10-2001).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,749 Posts
Aluminum flares just like brake lines but is a lot easier to flare. The 1/2 inch is VERY easy to bend and install with the car on the frame.

------------------
Redrum (or Mike)
68 Corvette - 383 CI 427 HP
69 SS Chevelle being updated to Pro-Touring
97 Z-28
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,016 Posts
I used the 1/2" aluminum and secured it to ther frame with 1/2" rubber covered clamps. I dropped my gas tank to paint it and drilled a 1/2" hole next to the original pick up tube and soldered in a 1/2" steel tube bent to the same shape and length as the original. I used a large soldering gun and it worked great.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top