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ok this what i got i had a tach that read 200 on the gauge when car was warm that tach had a copper sender no wiring,so i purchased a another water tach to match my rpm and volt hooked it up im only getting a reading of about 160 to 165 this tach is "wired" im trying so see what i did wrong,should i have put teflon on the thread,2nd had to use two diffent fittings together to get the sender in the intake, sender was smaller,dont know if the sender is down far enough or what, need some advice,the car is a 66 chevelle with a 350 sb,edelbrock performance intake
 

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well, if your new gauge is electric, then, no you shouldn't put any sealer on the fitting. and 200 degrees is usually a good temp to run at.

and, for future reference- the only gauge that is called a "tach" is the one that reads engine speed.
 

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Put the sender into a pot of boiling water and see if the gauge reads correctly for your altitude.

If it's electric, you'll probably need to rig up power and ground wires. It's a lot easier if it's a mechanical gauge.
 

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ok this what i got i had a tach that read 200 on the gauge when car was warm that tach had a copper sender no wiring,so i purchased a another water tach to match my rpm and volt hooked it up im only getting a reading of about 160 to 165 this tach is "wired" im trying so see what i did wrong,should i have put teflon on the thread,2nd had to use two diffent fittings together to get the sender in the intake, sender was smaller,dont know if the sender is down far enough or what, need some advice,the car is a 66 chevelle with a 350 sb,edelbrock performance intake
ok here are some possible solutions there should not be any teflon tape or sealant on the threads as the thread act as a ground for the sending unit. no problem with the sender being above the intake a bit due to the extra fitting. think of the sender as simply plugging a hole,if you took it out you'd definately get a big water leak, right? if it's a quality electric gauge it should read the same as a mechanical water temp gauge. ive always been a bit leary of electric wate temp and oil pressure gauges just because senders can cause problems, but that's just me. if you can't do a test as Schurkey suggested, get a cooking thermometer and put it in the radiator, start the car and let it warm up and compare the gauge to the thermometer reading. be sure to start with a relatively cool engine so you can safely remove the radiator cap. :yes:
 
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