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I'll be the first to admit I'm clueless when it comes to electrical systems, I've always avoided them.

In my car, I had a voltage regulator that's lasted for years. Last year, I had a nasty short in my electrical system that took out most of the electrical, and I ended up replacing most of it (new harness, alternaor, regulator, fuse block, etc.). It worked great for about 9 months, and last night, the charging system failed.

The first thing I thought was alternator, but replacing the alternator still results in 12V at the batteries, so I figured that there's still a problem, and the only thing I can think of is the regulator.

How often do regulators go bad? Is there something that might cause them to go bad? Any thoughts for what I might do this time to make sure that this regulator/alternator combo last longer?

This is a 2-battery, remote shut off system. I'm using an externally regulated alternator. No AC, 2 big electric fans (on a switched relay). I've got a magneto, so while the car will keep running, things like lights and fans fail when the batteries die.

Thanks...
 

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I’ve noticed the same thing. The original Delco regulators lasted for years. My original, in the 72, lasted almost 30 years. Found the same thing with ignition modules in HEI distributors. The Delco units last longer than the aftermarket replacements.
It’s hard for me to recommend the Delco regulator because of the price they sell for. However, in my 72 I did install a new Delco regulator. In my 64 I put in a Wells solid state regulator because I feel it’s a better product that the aftermarket mechanical units.
Just my opinions.
 

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kinzli, sori to steal your post but I have a regulator question that John may be able to help me with ....I have a 66 undergoing restification with an original 61 amp alt and a " transisterized" adjustable regulator I found a NOS transistorized regulator assuming the original would not be good ?? Can anyone / John tell me why I should NOT use this old style " transistorized regulator TIA
 

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I wouldn't use the transistorized regulator because it doesn't work any better than the the cheep modern regulators. I would sell it. The Corvette guys will give a fist full of cash for an NOS transistor regulator.
 

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Jeff,
I have never had a problem with the oem type regulators but..... I have never tried them on a car with dual batteries and all the extra fans etc. I wonder if you are just pushing it to its limit ? You did not mention what alternator you are using, the alternator and regulators are probably designed to work together as a pair.
Just some thoughts,
 

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Ellree ...... re transisterized reg Thanks for reply..... my car came with it and corresponding 61 amp Alt. ..... so as long as there is no reason to not use it I would like to do that ... I would go to a Wells reg if it would be more reliable and or work better .....anyone else have any experience with the reliability and perf of these old transistorized regulator ?? other than ensuring good voltage to my MSD box I have no other high demand electrical needs like electric fans , pumps or power access etc
 

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I would recommend you NOT use the vintage transistor voltage regulator. Why? These units are of the same era of the transistor ignition systems. They utilized germanium based high current transistors, many times the exact same ones used in the original Delco radios. These transistors are notorious for shorting out from collector to emitter, having something like this under the hood where there is excessive heat and vibration is a recipe for disaster. It would probably work fine, but for how long...chances are it would die in the middle of the road at night.

Also, most of the transistor ignition systems offered by GM in '65 and later vehicles (especially the Corvettes) are very well known for their failures for the reasons I've mentioned. This was more of a "chance to test the waters" for Delco electronics design work, it was all leading up to what we all know and love, HEI ignition systems.

As I see it, you have (2) choices, put it on the market as Elree suggests and you have the possibility of making $$$$$, or place it in a shoebox for safe-keeping knowing you have all the factory goodies for your car in your possession. Hope that helps.

Joe
 

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Yes it does help and your explanation makes alot of sense ... Thank-you for the detailed info

what I pbly will do is keep it on ( most don't know what it is and it does look kinda cool) but have a Wells unit in the glove box or switch it out for long trips/ raceday etc etc .... I do remember how notorious the early GM transistor ignitions were for failing
 
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