Team Chevelle banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've searched the archives on this before posting, but could not find the exact information I was looking for.

I've got a '69 Chevelle BB with external regulator (brand new regulator and alternator by the way). On my voltometer I am getting a reading of 16v while driving. I've seen where other posts have mentioned a range of 13.8 to 14.2 @ 1000 rpm. Is 16v too much? If so, what could be wrong?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,758 Posts
My take is the regulator sounds like it's out of adjustment. The battery, among other things, is not going to like 16 volts.
They are adjustable but I don't play with them. Put in a solid state regulator. It drop fits in place of the mechanical. Places like AutoZone have them for around $12.00. Ask them for a Wells VR715 regulator. It should give you an output of around 14.7 volts. No adjusting is needed. Disconnect the battery before installing. The Wells unit needs its case grounded to the core support.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks John. I'm not sure if the regulator I have is the mechanical adjustable kind or solid state as you describe. However, I bought it new recently. I'll check it out to see if that is the problem.

Thanks for your input.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,413 Posts
When John mentioned grounding the new regulator it made me think that you should check that the regulator on there now is grounded. Every regulator needs the base properly grounded to work correctly.

Peter
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
John D. - What is the electrolyte? And what would be a discharge condition. Just curious. I'd like to know what they are in case they occur, I will know what to look for.

Peter F. - I will check to be sure that my VR is properly grounded. If it is not, could it be causing the high voltage reading?

Thanks for the additional input.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,152 Posts
Electrolyte is the fancy name for the acid in the battery, and discharge would be the condition of where the car is sucking more juice than the alternator can replace, the "extra" current needed will be drawn from the battery reserve, and eventually go dead / discharged.(always playing catch-up)
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top