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Discussion Starter #1
I just bought a digital MulitiMeter the other day, and would appreciate a good source on the proper way to use it. I tried some net sites, but they just provided the basics.

Thanks.

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Joe G.
ChicagoChevelle68
Any car past 1972 is just simply transportation, really!
 

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What is it you want to measure?
to measure voltage you measure in parallel
to the circuit and for current in series
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It's a handheld meter. I would like to know how to use all of the rotary steettings.

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Joe G.
ChicagoChevelle68
Any car past 1972 is just simply transportation, really!
 

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When measuring voltage, set the dial to either AC or DC, according to what you are measuring, and the proper VOltage range, it may be 20, 200, or 2000 volts. AC is house voltage and DC is car voltage, like from a battery. Put the RED lead on the supply side of the voltage and the black lead on the return. DC voltage will read PLUS or MINUS voltage. AC only reads PLUS. To measure AMPS, you will probably need a real AMP meter, as most Multimeters read in milliamps. It can also be used to measure CONTINUITY, which means 'Is the wire broken?' Set the dial to OHMS. Touch either lead to either side of the wire, but be careful not to touch VOLTAGE. Testing for CONTINUITY shows a resistance value. This should be very low if the wire is good. Spark Plug wires usually have some resistance. This is measured in OHMS PER FOOT of resistance. This also tests DIODES. Continuity runs one way but not the other. Touch one lead to each side. If no reading, reverse the leads. If it shows CONTINUITY only in one direction, the diode is OK. If nothing in either direction, the diode is bad. Hope that this helps. If I can help further, feel free to ask. Dennymac


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Dennymac
'69 Elky Rebuild in process
dennymac.com
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It came with minimal and basic instruction....in five different lanquages.



Thanks for the info guys, especailly dennymac. I just want to learn to use it intelligently and master it in all applications. Give the image a look and tell me what you think of it.

Thank you.

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Joe G.
ChicagoChevelle68
Any car past 1972 is just simply transportation, really!
 

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Dennymac has you covered. To further elaborate with the picture you provided:
For DC/AC volts & resistance (ohms) you would insert the red lead in the far right connector and the black lead in the center connector (labeled COM for common).

DC volts is represented as a V with a solid line over a dashed line. There are 6 range settings on DC volts 200mV, 2V, 20V, 200V, 600V. These represent the maximum you can measure. Typically you would select the smallest to obtain the most accuracy. i.e. for 12V car battery applications you would select 20V, for checking a 1.5V battery you would select 2V.

AC Volts in represented with a V~. There are two ranges supported. 200V & 600V. For most household applications you would select the 200V range. Go ahead select the 200V range and stick those two leads into the nearest electrical outlet. It will read around 110-120V.

Ohms is used to measure resistance or continuity. A piece of wire will (theoretically) read 0 ohms. However, in reality it will have some resistance (dependant on size, length, and material) and therefore you may not read 0.00 if on the lowest scale (200) You may read 0.05 etc. There are several ranges again to provide the most accuracy when needed. Ohms will actually provide a small amount of current through the leads and therefore you may not get an accurate reading if there is any voltage present . You will notice a little picture of a speaker on this scale. This position will enable an audible tone when you have continuity and can be quite handy when tracing wires. The ranges supported are 200ohms, 2K (2000), 20K, 200K, 2Meg (2,000,000). Also under the 2K is a picture of a diode. This would be the preferred scale to check a diode. As Dennymac said, a diode will only show continuity in one direction (when good). This scale will provide enough current to correctly measure a diode and will display the voltage required to "turn-on" the diode in one direction only. This is typically in the range of .6-.7V.

Amps is DC AMPS on this meter only, as represented by an A with a solid line over a dashed line. To measure Amps greater than 200mA, you would need to insert the red lead in the far left connector (black lead remains in the COM). Be real careful as this will only read 10Amps MAX and is UNFUSED! If the current exceeds 10A you will have smoke.
Don't try to measure the output of your alternator here


When you get more familiar with this you will realize what a valuable tool it is when trouble shooting any electrical problem.



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Paul
TC Member #1657
'66 SS 396/360
Me and My ride
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I know this is an old post but Paul (RedHot66), if you see this, thanks a bunch for you're last post.... just helped me out of a problem :thumbsup:
 
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