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Discussion Starter #1
I'm about to re-install my intake manifold ('68 307 2bbl) and have located two copper flat washers. I believe that they relate to the throttle cable/stock coil mount bracket position. If anyone has this set-up, please indicate precisely where (under/over/against which bracket) they belong. They were initially installed with a purpose, so I want to maintain that function.

Also, give me a reason to scrap my stock coil (for another original-style type) by indicating what symptoms arise when they begin to fail. I don't think its actually faulty, but that'd be one less part to detail during my re-assembly. Please, no suggestions for a 'performance' coil.

And for extra points!...
Please suggest what I should do to service my stock distributor while its removed. Can I simply use brake cleaner to detail the shaft area above the gear? What about cam lubricant? Anything else? Points and condenser will be replaced once I ensure that everything else is back in place and running. (This vehicle has remained too original for 34 years to swap for a 'performance' distributor, thank you very much
.

Thanks, guys.
Brian

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Brian Scott
1968 el Camino Custom
307-PG Purchased 11/01 w/81k (2 CA owner)miles.
"An eBay success story!"

[This message has been edited by madaboutabba (edited 02-24-2002).]
 

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Those copper washers are used under the two front bolts that hold down the front of the stock 2 bbl carb. An assembly manual would be a great thing to buy--it will answer this and a whole lot of other questions on misc. pieces and where they go. I don't know if your car has the idle solenoid that bumps up the idle speed, but on the later Chevy's these copper washers make sure the solenoid bracket has a good ground. Even if you don't have one, they're probably still there for a good ground.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for your feedback. I see now where the washers were in position. One of the four mounting nuts was really tough to remove so I left it to the machine shop (which also had to remove a broken stud & extractor from the thermostat mount). The washers ended up in the box with other small parts. I have no electrical function on my stock carburetor, so the washers probably don't serve a conductive function, right?

I've seen the assembly manual reprints on eBay. Could you recommend any alternate sources?

Thanks,
Brian

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Brian Scott
1968 el Camino Custom
307-PG Purchased 11/01 w/81k (2 CA owner)miles.
"An eBay success story!"
 

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Brian,

I bought my assembly manual from Year One about 6 years ago. I am VERY happy with the quality of the printing (since most of the printing was crappy before someone attempted to reproduce them). I have no idea how they are in today's market. I've heard that a lot of the ones at swap meets and eBay are the bottom of the barrel (really hard to see--like they are a copy of a copy or something).

I went thru the washer situation on my 2bbl (it's a '70 though). I still think you need them as they provide sorta of seal since the hot exhaust by-pass that runs under the front of the carburetor will really eat-up the bolts on the front of the carb. Copper doesn't rust, so I think that's why the factory put them there. If it were me I'd put it back as is. But again, no expert here. Maybe your machine shop could help. Just going by what I had to deal with and the assembly manual.
 

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Brian, I just finished servicing my dist. on my 68SS. I used a chrome polish called Simichrome to polish up the shaft again.Any chrome polish (Never Dull,etc) will work.Also used it on the cam where the lubricator touches.Then i took some 320grit sandpaper and sanded the top of the cam where the weights sit,as well as the post that they mount to/and the spring post.I would change the springs too while your at it.I had a lot of rust on mine so I replaced everything.When you remove the shaft and take off the cam and base plate, there's a plastic cover under the foam washer that helps keep the grease in the little chambers around the shaft tube.Be careful when removing it.Mine was so old it crumbled when I was trying to figure out what it was and i stuck a screwdriver through it.Tom Parsons (DZAUTO), was nice enough to send me a new one.Most auto parts stores can't get em any more.I cleaned out the dried,old grease and repacked the chambers with bearing grease.Then, I used a long screwdriver and loaded up the shaft tube with grease also.When you slide in the shaft, rotate it to get the grease everywhere.Use the contact cleaner to clean out the tube first,then grease it.Also replace the cam wick with a new one.Do not reoil it.

Mine was the original ignition setup also and was never serviced beyond points/condenser.There was alot of oil in the base of mine as well as the rust I mentioned on the cam/weight plate. after I serviced mine, it worked great.I repainted the stock coil cause it was still goin good.I think when they go-they go out.I haven't had trouble w/it yet so I don't know...

[This message has been edited by speedster (edited 02-26-2002).]

[This message has been edited by speedster (edited 02-26-2002).]
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks, Speedster- that's some detailing! Were you involved in a full engine rebuild with this distributor project? It sounds like the better part of a day to do it right, as you have. I'm also trying to retain the original configuration while cleaning and detailing here and there. Tomorrow, I expect to finish detailing & installing the 2bbl Rochester, gap & install plugs and then light the burners (does a stock 307 qualify as having "burners"?). Sadly, I expect to chase my tail with re-establishing timing. I think I've read all I can to the point of confusing myself. My rotor now points more towards the 8 o'clock (than normal 7 o'clock position) with crank at zero degrees, but as long as I establish that position as #1 firing, it should still be okay, right?

For now, I only wish to achieve a running engine. If this is successful, I'll replace points and condenser (springs, too?) in short time. I don't need additional variables with my novice skill level!

If you reply, please indicate where I can obtain the cam wick. I don't see it as a listed component when on-line searching the auto parts stores inventories. How about the weight springs?

Take care,
Brian

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Brian Scott
1968 el Camino Custom
307-PG Purchased 11/01 w/81k (2 CA owner)miles.
"An eBay success story!"

[This message has been edited by madaboutabba (edited 02-26-2002).]
 

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Brian,

Sounds like you've done a lot of work - great job! As for the stock coil and distributer though...I'd seriously consider going to a boneyard and getting an HEI. I did this to my 327. It took no time to hook it up, and the driveability improvement was tenfold. Mileage picked up, startability improved, I just can't say enough about it.

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David Reinecke - aka - FINE 68
1968 Chevelle 300 Sport Coupe Deluxe
www.geocities.com/jdreinecke
 

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Brian
I won't screw around buying a manual from Ebay. These are widely available from any restoration place. Click on the sponsor's link (Ground Up) on the bottom of the page. They have them.
 

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Brian- I started out to rebuild the carb.Then,I noticed and oil leak in the intake manifold gasket,THEN,I decided I was gonna degrease and repaint the engine and compartment.So I took the distributor out to remove the manifold.After staring at it in awe(clueless)I removed the cap and realized how bad it was.Decided "What the hell!", and took it apart.I am a novice too and this was my first experience w/a points dist.But I took my time and everybody here helped me w/all my questions along the way. So don't be afraid to jump in and get your feet wet.

O.K.- now back to your deal.. I'm not familiar w/the 307 so The o'clock position thing isnt gonna fly.So I say find the #1 cylinder,remove the spark plug and then remove the wire in the center of the coil so the car wont start.Bump the starter around with the key in the ignition until the #1 piston comes all the way up to the top of the plug hole.I stuck a long screwdriver in the hole to touch the piston as it comes up.Dont hold it tight-you dont want to scratch the piston.Just set it on the piston and let it come up.When its all the way up your ready to get the distributor in the right spot with the rotor point facing that cylinder.You may have to pull out the dist. a few times to get the rotor in the right place.Just take your time and be careful.Then youll be ready to put your wires on.Make sure theyre in the right order also.

That is the timing part done.Now the cam wick- Call around the part stores and ask them to look in their kits to see if it is there.Some of them have them, some don't.Shop around.Mine was about $10.00.As far as the springs- you can get an "Advance kit" that will have the weights,center plate, and 3 sets of springs that are different stiffness.I would use the ones that feel most like yours to begin with.That kit is also about $10.00.

There it is in long form. I've got a 68 service manual if you need to see some pics let me know-Ill be glad to scan them over.And Im sure everyone else here will lend a hand.GOOD LUCK!

Guys-help me out if I screwed something up and didn't catch it.Won't be the first time.


[This message has been edited by speedster (edited 02-26-2002).]

[This message has been edited by speedster (edited 02-26-2002).]
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Speedster-My indication is that the 'normal' #1 firing position on the distributor cap (while viewing from above & facing cowl) is approximately at the 7 o'clock position. However, I also believe that the rotor doesn't care where #1 lies, as long as the correct firing sequence is maintainted throughout the remainder of the cap terminals (clockwise direction, of course). Am I correct with this thinking?

I expect to re-install the carb tonight and fire tonight or early tomorrow. I hope that the carb linkage re-assembly will be trouble-free.

The OPGI discount ends Thursday so I will be buying the 3-edition shop/body/assembly manual set and a couple of reproduction decals to compliment my (...partial) engine bay detailing (the original Tonowanda valve cover decal is still 95% intact, though missing much of the lettering- the air cleaner lid decal was pretty trashed and has now been removed). Thanks for the offer to scan images, I might take you up on that!

That HEI conversion seems VERY tempting as my stock 307 is also my daily driver (fuel economy is highly coveted!).

Thanks again,
Brian

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Brian Scott
1968 el Camino Custom
307-PG Purchased 11/01 w/81k (2 CA owner)miles.
"An eBay success story!"
 

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Brian, you are correct on the cap. As long as the wires are put on in the proper firing order, it can be turned any way you want it.The rotor however, must be facing the #1 piston at TDC.You can take the rotor off and remount it facing the #1 cylinder after you put the dist. back in. TDC on Cyl#1 and rotor facing it.Your good to go.

My Tonawanda sticker was still intact too but it was starting to peel off.So I did the same thing your gonna do.I ordered all the engine compartment decals from OPG.They had all of them in stock and they look good too.I just got the new catalog from them this morning-It's got alot of new stuff in it.VERY COOL! Seems like your one step behind me.HaHa!

Also-I just finished installing my HEI w/a MSD6AL box. SSSWWEEEEET! I got if off a 70Chevy LWB Truck I just bought from a friend.That was easier to put on than rebuilding the points distributor.

307 gas mileage??? Try driving a 396BB for a month or two.I keep looking under the car for gas leaks!


Have fun! -Joel
 
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