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It seems every year, I am crawling around under my trailer replacing side lights, wires, tail lights, repairing connections that have got water into them, getting the electic brakes working etc. I just did it all again today and after all that crawling around my knees hurt and my back is stiffer than a honeymoon erection. Can anyone suggest anything other than tape, heat shrink, etc to put over the connections to keep moisture out! Or how to keep the sockets from rusting away? My knees and my back will thank you!

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Terry
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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the response Dean. I have tried silicone and wire nuts and in the spring you just touch them and they fall apart. Today I used butt connectors, heat shink over top, and then I covered every connection with Goop! I don't know if it the moist climate or what, but if I put a brand new tail light on in the spring, it is junk by the next spring. The same goes for the clearance lamps. All the contacts or springs are rusted away to nothing. I think I may just have to quit lending my trailer to friends in the winter when all that salt is on the road.I replaced every light on it today, and a good amount of wiring!
 

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Have you tried greasing the light assemblies? What about spraying something like Fluid Film on the sockets? Just make sure to fill or cover any exposed electrical part in the light with something.

As for the wire, get tin coated stranded copper wire. If the wire is silver, it's good. If it's copper coloured, it'll corrode.

You could get some high voltage electrical tape. It's 3M and called something like 69kV Tape. This stuff can be wrapped really tightly and it bonds to itself so well you can't unwrap it. It'll also stick to almost everything it comes in contact with.

That's all I have.

Peter
 

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WHen I splice wires, I use crimp on solderless connectors. I take all the plastic off of them (heat with a lighter, pulls right off). After crimping I solder them to the wires. Then shrink tube over the whole connection. This has worked for me so far, it's the best I could come up with.

chris
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by bulb122:
WHen I splice wires, I use crimp on solderless connectors. I take all the plastic off of them (heat with a lighter, pulls right off). After crimping I solder them to the wires. Then shrink tube over the whole connection. This has worked for me so far, it's the best I could come up with.

chris
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Sounds like a good method as does the heat shrink tubing also
You can't hardley beat a good soldered connection

I usually coat everything with dielectric grease too, especially bulbs and sockets
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Sorry I have not been back to thank you guys for your responses, but I have been away since last Sunday. Chris's suggestion sounds like a good one and I am going to try it. I had an electrician here yesterday and watched him trying to take off some of that 3M stuff Peter mentioned. Boy did that stuff make a seal! I am going to wrap the connections with that as well. Thanks again guys!
 
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