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Discussion Starter #1
In 1979 my uncle paid me for farm work with a 454 engine and a 400 trans, and me being stupid and young took it apart eager to rebuild it " of which it didnt need"
and now 20 years later I find it has become rusty ever though it has been oiled and kept dry. A machine shop advised me to have it sand blasted but I thought that chemical strip might be better I would like
know if the forum has any advise or warnings Thanx
 

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Find another machine shop! Sand blasting is the worst thing you can do to an engine block prior to a rebuild. It'll get into every little crannie & no matter how much you clean it ther'll always be residual sand left over. The best way to get rid of rust on an engine is to have it BAKED in an oven. Even if you have to ship out, it's worth it. Check with performance machine shops first.

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Lowered '67 Elcamino
ZZ430 eng / 4L60E trans
"Canyon Carver"
 

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Your best bet is to send it out to a "Respectable" shop and get it tanked and cleaned properly. It will get the rust out of the weirdest nooks & crannies and clean out your coolant passages as well. This way, you'll start out with the cleanest block that you can get.

DO NOT ever introduce abrasives like sand to an engine block! Like Cardiac said... You have a dead motor in no time!

Hope it Helps

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The proud owner of a Canadian 64-SS with ZZ4 Power!
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WebSite www.magma.ca/~ssoltesz/steves/1964.htm
 

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These guys speaketh the truth! Don't even think about going back to the shop that suggested sandblasting the engine (whole or just the block). If they think this is OK, God only knows what else they think is good practice!
 

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Ditto to all the above!! Find another shop. BTW, there's a school of thought that rust on engine blocks(and heads) "seasons" them, somehow making the metal stronger or something. I've even heard of guys throwing their parts outside on purpose for this reason. Anybody else heard of this practice? I know I've used junkyard parts that were extremely rusty and with PROPER care from my machinist (no sandblasting)had very good results.
Bryan

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'70 C-20 Longhorn p/u (daily driver)
 

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This is the way it was told to me years ago. I have no idea if this is true or not, but it sounds reasonable.
The term "Seasoned" came from the foundery. They would cast so many blocks that they had to store them outside, then when it came time for assembly they would be rusty, usually a year later or the next "Season." Therfore you have a seasoned block.


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Lowered '67 Elcamino
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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for your response and I also thought sandblasting sounded crazy but do
you have any opinion on chemical or redi strip it seems like the best way to me please advise
 
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