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Stock 327 log style manifolds with rusty, broken, and frozen bolts, mainly on passs. side manifold. Any tips on how to get them out? Am I better off just taking them to a muffler shop? Thanks for any help. 64elkynss
 

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Douse them with WD 40 or your favorite weasel pee. Tap the stud with a center punch and hammer if you can access it. Give it a try with a good six point socket, and try to work it both ways. If you get it to move, spray the newly exposed threads with the juice.

If no luck with above strategy, use heat from a propane torch or oxy acet if you have it . Just don't crank the stud too fast, or it will snap in block.

Good Luck

John
 

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yea I like pb and this stuff called silikroil, however if they are bad I awalys soak them for a few days before even trying to remove them
 

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lots of heat from a oxy acetyl set. A propane torch won't get hot enough.
 

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My favorite method of loosening stuck bolts is to soak them good with WD-40, PB Blaster or similar, and then give them a few good blows with a hammer. Once they start moving, I do what Out66Cast suggested and turn them back and forth as I remove them (like 2 turns out, one turn in, two turns out etc) while spraying them with more WD-40. If you just keep on unscrewing them, they can stick and snap.

If you have broken studs stuck in the cylinder head, but still have some of the stud sticking out, you can MIG weld a nut to them. This will heat the stud, and provide a new head at the same time. Let it cool off a bit before you try to turn it, the bolt can snap if it's too hot.
 

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With the manifolds off the car and enough stud to grab with vise grips, I heat the area to cherry red and the studs come out quite easily. Let it cool off slowly. Worked for me.
Yep, that always works for me too except I use something that grips much better than vise grips, I use #410 Channellock pipe pliers
http://www.sjdiscounttools.com/cha410.html
 

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Tap the top of the bolt first with a center punch or something similar. If you can get the bolt to loosen Back it out slightly, then immediately tightened it back into the tighten position (always slightly loosen more than tighten). Keep doing this until the bolt comes out, and spray your favorite rust penetrant on all the time while doing this. You will be amazed how many bolts WILL come out this way. I learned this from a master tech of some 30 years. He stated he got tired of replacing and drilling out bolts and this seemed to work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks to everyone for the tips. I really do appreciate all the help! 64elkynss
 

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Get yourself some liquid wrench or some Kroil if you can find it. Kroil is the best money can buy. I'm sorry, but WD-40 is more a lubricant than a penetrating oil. Keep soaking and tapping the head of the bolt. A small pneumatic butterfly impact will also vibrate the bolt and cause the penetrant to work its way into the threads. Eastwood has Kroil in their catalog, Either spray cans or gallons.
 

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Unfortuneately, with manifold bolts that are into the cylinder heads, you can spray and spray and because the head is the only part exposed, you are only soaking the head of the bolt and not the threads. I would first suggest heating it up. Spraying cant hurt but wont likely do much till you get the bolt to move enough to soak some penetrant on the threaded area.
 

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I usually mig weld a nut like Olle mentioned for heads, only I also use it on manifolds, bumpers just about everything.

Some times it will take three or four nuts to get one to take, then on occasion I have had to drill into the broken bolt a little bit, then weld a nut to it, gives the weld more metal to get a hold of.

I use a 110 mig, turned on the highest setting, about half on the wire feed, put the nozzle flush with the top of the nut, give it just a little, then back off at the same time and weld it.

Then somebody else mentioned turning a little bit at a time back and fourth, and just a little pressure back and fourth to start with usually works.

Rob
 

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Patience is the most important part. Give the penetrating oil time to work, maybe a week. Tap on the end of the bolt. If possible drill a small hole all the way through the bolt and shoot some penetrant into the back side. It all depends on how much of the bolt is left to work with. It's always best to try to get the bolt out without boogering the threads. Don't take the advice of the guy that tells you to drill it out and retap it. That should ALWAYS be the very last resort. (And then, if possible, put the part the bolt held on, back in place, and use it for a guide to drill out the hole.)

What I have done with large bolts in blind holes that are frozen, is drill and tap an 1/8 pipe thread in the bolt and put a grease fitting in the end. Pump grease into it until some comes out of the threads. Remove the grease fitting and drive a short piece of 3/8" Allen wrench into it and start working it with an impact wrench. This works pretty good when the circumstances are right. Penetrant with grease may work better sometimes.

Tapered easyouts very seldom work well for me. The taper usually presses against the bolt sides and makes it tighter. Also, the metal they are made of is harder than Hitler's heart and if they break off, you can't get that out. There are some types that have a short, straight, serrated twist in them that you drive into a hole that you drill in the bolt, and they bottom out against the part sticking out and don't wedge the sides out. I like those better. Don't remember who makes them.
 

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If you heat them up you can press a candle to the base and it will "wick" the wax into the threads.
If he is talking about the the bolts that hold the manifolds to the cylinder heads. With only the heads of the bolts exposed, the wax has no real way of going down to get into the threads of the cylinder heads, where it really needs it.

Candle wax really does work good for this kind of stuff if you can get it into the threads though.:cool:
 

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Greetings!

I have not encountered this but have a safety concern question.
If not for me, for the other inexperienced "Newbie" that is trying this
for the first time.

What steps do you take in disconnecting or removing fuel lines -
vapors when using a torch / welder? Also, WD-40 and others, are they
not flammable - to keep away from spark or open flame. How long after
you soak these bolts down do you start in with the torch?

You can never be too safe!

Thank you for your expert advise.

Rudy
 
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