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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone run across this problem?
It seems after searching through the Chevelle forums that the torque spec for the tierod ends is 35 ft lbs. But in order for me to get the castle nut on far enough to place the cotter pin, I have to torque much higher.
Anyone else run into this?
70 hardtop,
Installing new front-end set from Anderson Restoration.

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Unsure on that. I will have to loosen and retighten today to check properly and let you know.
Well now that they're on, they are a bear to pull off to check on the torque to tighten when installing new.
I do know that the right side was north of 60 to get cotter pin hole to line up.
I've attached a pic to show how far the threads are coming through..

Also, I've held off tightening the lower tierod ends to the steering arms until I was sure of proper torque spec on thiose.
Any info on the spec for them?
Thanks again everyone
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1969 Chevy Chevelle SS396, M20, 12 bolt 3:55, 454 w/fuel injection
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As Pugsy said earlier, tapered fit. The specs for the outers are 25-35ft lbs.
Per assembly manual: “A torque of 50 ft lbs max is permissible when slot is in correct position for insertion of cotter pin.” This is a notation referring to the nut on the outer tie end to the steering arm. I would suppose that could also include the tie rod to center link nut as well. If you are past 60lbs ft, something is amiss. Is your torque wrench calibrated?
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Don't sweat it too much.
I've only used a torque wrench on engines, transmissions and diffs.
Everything else on the car, German. Gudentite.
 

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Generally as others have said, we don't torque those parts. The German term "gud n tite" and insert cotter pin is what I use. I would not knock it apart to check.
 

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I was a front end guy for years, I never once torqued a castle nut good n tight then to the next slot that lines up with the hole, never lost or broke anything. Just don't ever back one off to get the cotter pin in.
 

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Unless you stripped the threads and you felt the nut getting looser as you turned it, then there's no reason for you to remove the cotter pin and start over. I always use a torque wrench on those, but the spec says 35 ft/lbs to indicate the level of torque to take the nut to, and then you go merely turn the nut only as much more as you have to, in order to line up the first available slot with that of the stud. If the slot is completely lined up with the hole in the stud as soon as you reach the 35 ft/lb threshold, then you stop there and slide in the cotter pin. If not, then you just go as much further as you need to, in order to line it up. As it's been said, it isn't unusual to have top get it to 50 ft/lbs to line up the slot with the hole. Not a big deal at all
 
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