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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Why do you have to adjust rockers on a solid cam all the time. Why do they keep coming more loose? No material is being removed. I can't imagine the adjusting nut coming loose. What is happening?
 

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It's the adjusting nuts. You have to get them really tight. Also check the top of your rocker studs.

I usually rough set lash, back the nuts off a 1/4 turn, tighten the set screws, then turn the nut against the stud until you have lash right again.

This should hold them almost indefinately.

If not, you should consider stud girdles. I use them - and they keep things from moving.

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Are you saying that if you have a stud girdle you don't have to re-set lash w/ a solid roller? I have never heard of that.
 

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I thought that solid cam valve lash needed to be reset due to wear on the cam or lifters. I also thought that you didn't adjust hydraulics as often because, since the lifter height is dependant on the pressure of the oil inside them, that it would compensate for the wear in the cam and other valve components.

It would seem that if soild cams needed re-lashing only because they deflected the rocker studs more (presumibly because of their more radical ramps / lift), that if you ran a mild "hydraulic" cam grind with solid lifters, you would not have to re-lash them any more than a hydraulic. If this is true, why even have hydraulic lifters? I thought the only advantage of hydraulics (other than less noise) is that they didn't need to be adjusted as much.

Can someone elaborate on this?


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Charles Perrell
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65 malibu SS Convertible
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If I'm not mistaken the advantages of hydraulic lifters are that they reduce impact loads on the valvetrain and also allow for bleed-off at lower RPM's, effectively reducing duration, so that a "larger" cam can be used without sacrificing as much in the low-end.
 

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Michael,
I don't know how large a cam you are running, but a small, street roller type cam should not need adjusting all that often unless there is a problem. If the lash is increasing, then either the poly-locks are moving, or something is wearing. If the lash is getting tighter, there is a good chance that the valve is "sinking" itself into the valve seat. Even without a stud girdle, it should settle down after a few adjustments. Like "malibu" said, if the cam is fairly radical, a stud girdle will certainly help keep adjustments to maybe once a year, depending on how much you drive. The stud girdle ties the entire valve train together and keeps things from moving around.
As far as hydraulic lifters go, thier only advantage is the fact that they do not have to be adjusted, period. They certainly have no performance advantage, if anything its the other way around. They were originally introduced for the express reason of not having to be adjusted.
Hope this helps,

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Bill Koustenis
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We run the polylock nuts on our L78 and the lifters only get adjusted when real boredom sets in. Solid lifter cams are not the hassle that people would lead you to believe. If you need to be adjusting all the time then you have a problem some where.
 
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