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I'm aware that this may be a little early for this subject but I'm wanting to get a set of snow shoes before we get snow this year.I get a lot of drifts in my back yard,some really deep ones and since I'll be getting hip replacement surgery just before winter I was thinking snow shoes will help me with my situation.
So does anyone have a brand of snow shoes that I should look for ? or a specific type to get as in a quick look see I found multiple brands and prices along with two different types.Hoping for some help here ?
 

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Kinda, sorta rule of thumb...Long skinnny ones are for trail breaking/ cross country work. Short fat ones will be easier to maneuver in small areas. Minis are backpack emergency ones. For your back yard the mini's just might be what you need
 

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OK thats really helpful I don't want to just pick the cheapest one they have.Its seems like they're all about 79-89 and up.
 

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Look up different types of snow shoes before you buy and the type of terrain you will be using them on, flat, wooded, hilly, etc., also see what weight person they are recommended for, a few variables. Many, many years age I used bearpaw style while trapping (16 yrs old, 2+ ft. of snow and 150 lbs). I have a pair of brand new military surplus ones (alaskan style) that are Aluminum framed that I have never used.
'
 

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been years since I been on them with cousins. I do recall wide ones worked well. Up where they live if you stepped off snomobile trail you could be up to your neck. Word of caution with hip replacement go slow as I recall takes some toll on leg muscles.
 

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Yes we use them in the Army and we use the long ones to displace the weight and go in pretty much one direction on virgin snow drifts and lightly wooded areas.
If I were you I'd try to rent so stubby one's and see if your hip can take it. Aluminum is cheaper than magnesium shoes...also get one's that don't require you to wear a special boot...just a water proof or leather boot Rubber straps etc... You don't need another injury just putting them on and get help with that first few times...Your hips and legs are going to tell you they don't like this stuff.
Snow Branch Tent Tree Slope

Snow Tree Sky Slope Natural landscape


Went down to minus 20C that night and we had a 12 foot base with 8feet loose on top till we packed it down and snow shoed through with toboggans.
If you went off path with no shoes you sunk just like a rock! frozen lake crossing is always fun in snow shoes!
Sky Snow Plant Natural landscape Larch


Snow Tree Slope Outdoor recreation Terrain

Snow Sky Slope Tree Larch

One pass with a toboggan
Footwear Shoe Snow White Tire
 
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My wife and I bought TUBBS, but they're all M-I-C anyhow. I like its cable-actuated rachet down "binding". Very easy to get in and out of. The strap on bindings are a PITA, especially on the trail. Its the same type of binding seen on some snow boards. Me, Id always choose the rachet style. Makes it easy for an old guy to mount/dismount.

Since I am a svelte 225lbs, they're right sized, aka LARGE. HOWEVER, if I wasn't doing 2-3 mile walks thru the woods, a small size not designed for my weight would be more than adequate for back yard duty. EG, my wifes are approx 2" shorter and simply easier to walk in. But I got the big ones for me, a pack and a rifle.

 

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Stay away from snowshoes until you are fully, 100% healed from your hip replacement surgery. I have had both hips replaced and have been snowshoeing for 40 years. The problem with snowshoes is that when you stumble a bit you can't do a quick "stutter step" to catch up with your feet and you will often fall on your face. Catching them under crusted snow will also trip you up. Stick to walking on cleared sidewalks and trails until you are ready. Snowshoes are also added weight on your hip joint. Even the lightweight modern ones add stress to your leg muscles and joints.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Stay away from snowshoes until you are fully, 100% healed from your hip replacement surgery. I have had both hips replaced and have been snowshoeing for 40 years. The problem with snowshoes is that when you stumble a bit you can't do a quick "stutter step" to catch up with your feet and you will often fall on your face. Catching them under crusted snow will also trip you up. Stick to walking on cleared sidewalks and trails until you are ready. Snowshoes are also added weight on your hip joint. Even the lightweight modern ones add stress to your leg muscles and joints.
Why does a beach, a chair, sunglasses and many cold cocktails sounds like a better road to recovery?
Ahhhh and a drink waiting on the table next to you at all times to ease the pain...
Thanks for all the good vibes as I'm finally home.In on Tuesday morning and out on Wednesday evening.Aching but Ok.Capt no drinking for me until these strong pain killers are done but that beach sounds really good right about now,SFD .
Well maybe another day, TTYL Fellas
 
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