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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys!

I'm pretty new around here but I really, really enjoy the atmosphere not to mention the amazing amount of information that you guys all have! Very cool :thumbsup:

Anyway, I'm be bringing home my first Chevelle this weekend (1967 SS Clone, if all goes well) and I'm sure I'll have many more questions soon but right now I have a major concern about security.

I live outside of D.C., not a bad place at all, but since I plan on regularly driving this thing, how can I make sure it's still going to be there when the movie lets out?

What do you guys do to make these older cars atleast theft-deterent if not theft-proof?

Thanks in advance!

Brandon
 

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Go to the SPONSERS forum and look under ''most important car accessory ever'' . This is new on the market and sounds awsome ,check it out. :hurray:
 

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You can never have too many kill switches. JUst make sure your significant other or good buddy knows where they are. It is a real PITA if something happens and someone other then yourself needs to start or sell the car, without knowing about the switches....
 

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Go to the SPONSERS forum and look under ''most important car accessory ever'' . This is new on the market and sounds awsome ,check it out. :hurray:
Very Very Interesting!!!!!!!
 

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There are a number of different trains of thought on simple yet effective security measures. I have always thought that kill switches alone are easily defeated by anyone that knows enough to just pop the hood and run power directly from the battery to the coil (on an older car like ours), and then jump the starter. Thus, regardless of how many switches are installed, they are simply bypassed. To solve this, I use a hood lock system as well. The lock runs through the firewall, and when engaged, bolts the hood down. The lock also grounds out a wire running inside the cabling, so this can be used to disable the starter or the coil (I choose coil, as the car can be started without the starter, and it can be accessed from under the car anyways).

Now the only way the car can be stolen is by cutting holes in the hood to access the coil and battery, or by prying the hood off (or by towing the car away, but that is a whole different issue). So though there are still extreme measures that could be taken to steal the car, no one can just hop in and fiddle under the dash and do it, it will take time, and the more time it takes, the more likely they are to give up.

Anyways, if you run a search for security systems, you will find my posts on this setup. Isn't the only one, but for $50 (wolo hood lock) and an hour or two to figure out how you want to install it, I think it is pretty good bang for your buck.
 

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There are a number of different trains of thought on simple yet effective security measures. I have always thought that kill switches alone are easily defeated by anyone that knows enough to just pop the hood and run power directly from the battery to the coil (on an older car like ours), and then jump the starter. Thus, regardless of how many switches are installed, they are simply bypassed. To solve this, I use a hood lock system as well. The lock runs through the firewall, and when engaged, bolts the hood down. The lock also grounds out a wire running inside the cabling, so this can be used to disable the starter or the coil (I choose coil, as the car can be started without the starter, and it can be accessed from under the car anyways).

Now the only way the car can be stolen is by cutting holes in the hood to access the coil and battery, or by prying the hood off (or by towing the car away, but that is a whole different issue). So though there are still extreme measures that could be taken to steal the car, no one can just hop in and fiddle under the dash and do it, it will take time, and the more time it takes, the more likely they are to give up.

Anyways, if you run a search for security systems, you will find my posts on this setup. Isn't the only one, but for $50 (wolo hood lock) and an hour or two to figure out how you want to install it, I think it is pretty good bang for your buck.
Good Points. Forget all the fancy stuff, here is a picture of the security system the previous owner had installed on the 68 deluexe....
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
There are a number of different trains of thought on simple yet effective security measures. I have always thought that kill switches alone are easily defeated by anyone that knows enough to just pop the hood and run power directly from the battery to the coil (on an older car like ours), and then jump the starter. Thus, regardless of how many switches are installed, they are simply bypassed. To solve this, I use a hood lock system as well. The lock runs through the firewall, and when engaged, bolts the hood down. The lock also grounds out a wire running inside the cabling, so this can be used to disable the starter or the coil (I choose coil, as the car can be started without the starter, and it can be accessed from under the car anyways).

Now the only way the car can be stolen is by cutting holes in the hood to access the coil and battery, or by prying the hood off (or by towing the car away, but that is a whole different issue). So though there are still extreme measures that could be taken to steal the car, no one can just hop in and fiddle under the dash and do it, it will take time, and the more time it takes, the more likely they are to give up.

Anyways, if you run a search for security systems, you will find my posts on this setup. Isn't the only one, but for $50 (wolo hood lock) and an hour or two to figure out how you want to install it, I think it is pretty good bang for your buck.

Thanks Brad, you make some very good points.

I'll look up those other threads too. :)
 
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