Chevelles.com banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
367 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Automotive electronics has never been one of my strong suits, so I'll turn to you guys again. In reading the electronics in my assembly manual, I noticed something that got me curious. I see several pink wires that are shown all coming together at a 'point' in the drawing. (Kinda looks like a map where several streets come together) My guess is these all serve as a ground for what they're connected to, such as a guage or switch, although most often the ground is shown as an arrow sorta thing. Question is, are these wires a ground or do they serve some other purpose? (Hope this makes sense, my brain's a bit slow today
)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,762 Posts
Well, my take. A schematic is not meant to be an exact layout. It is only a pictorial of what is connected to what. The earlier schematics do closely resemble where the wires are in the car. As cars got more complicated the schematics are drawn more like a bunch of blocks or modules. The blocks may be next to each other, on the schematic, but are really in different places on the car.

What your schematic is showing is that all the pinks are tied together. They are not tied exactly how the schematic shows. The “point” doesn’t exist. It’s just how the draftsman chose to do it. GM does not use pink as a ground. In the cars around that time pink is a switched 12 volt wire. Should see it coming off the ignition switch in a Nova, Chevelle, Camaro, etc. The arrow looking thing is a schematic symbol. There’s a herd of standard schematic symbols. That’s one that means ground.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,762 Posts
Don
Try getting a copy of the Haynes Chevelle manual #625. Should find it at Pep Boys. Even though it covers 69 and up it contains a color key to wiring diagrams. Pink can be use in other places but what you see on your 67 is it's first use on the chart, "Feed Ignition switch "On and Crank" Controlled, unfused". (page 307).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
545 Posts
When the picture shows several wires all coming together to a common point it is a junction but not necessarily a ground.

Several wires attach to one terminal of your voltage regulator for instance. The schematic does not specify how the junction is made, but usually there is a common terminal as in the case of the voltage regulator.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top