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Hello. I just send my chevelle off for paint and am now starting on the engine. I have a 396 and most of the bottom end done and now am starting on the top end. My plans are to go with a rolling valvetrain set up. The only decision I haven't made is whether or not to go with solid or hydraulic lifters for my engine. My car is going to be a mostly street car but it will see the track some. Ive heard both sides saying hydraulic is better and solid is better. Also who makes the best lifters and rockers and what my best selection of cam would be. The bottom end is pretty much sock other than i have Speed Pro Hyperutectic pistons. It will have a edelbrock performer intake with a holley 750 carb.
Thanks for reading my questions, hopefully you guys know more than me.
 

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Good plan to go with the roller cam, you wont regret it. Im a solid roller fan, and mine is a street car. I have no problems with the setup, I adjust my lash once each season, it stays put the rest of the year. I dont know about the argument of more power with either hyd. or solid. If there is a difference, I doubt you will feel it. A hyd. roller setup would be nice, but I think the lifters are a bit more expensive. Man, there are a ton of ways you can go with this. Have you tried a search on those topics yet? There will probably be about a year of reading on cams and hyd. vs. solid rollers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Haha, Ya ive tried searching throuh cams and have done tons of reading and am still kinda on the line of what to do. Thats why I posted these questions. As for the power with hyd. vs. solid i dont think their is a difference like you said Im just curious on adjusting because some things Ive have read say if you adjust it once a year your good and others say more frequently. Thanks for you reply
 

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Actually the life of a solid roller on the street is not as long as you would expect. It seems the rollers wipe out after a few years and you should pull the lifters every year or two and see if you can detect one failing.
This is a problem with the oil.
I ran comp solid rollers for years but lost one this past summer along with a lobe on the cam.
I am trying Red Zones this time around with their supposedly superior roller oiling system.
Alot of guys are loosing their comp roller setups like myself
 

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Do you happen to know the cost on the red zones and are they still solid roller? I was thinking of running crower lifters.
I was told that the red zones are one of the best lifters out there. Our canadian price on comps solid rollers are about $400 and these Red Zones ran me $690.
They have a oversize roller and a 3 point oiling system. They advertise them good to 1000 pounds. My open pressure is 580 pounds.
I run a crane billet solid roller cam 264/270 @ .050 a low ,632 lift on 112 lobe centers. I run Isky lifters, brodix heads, comp push rods and crower stainless roller rockers. A real mix of parts but at the time the best I could find. Not cheap. Cam and lifters $1125 plus tax.
 

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I am going with a hydraulic roller (comp cams XR-282hr-10) in my 396. I was worried about solid roller lifters in a street car due to the cold start up issues. In general, about the worst thing you can do to needle bearings like those you find in roller lifters is to subject them to impact loads like those you get on a cold solid lifter motor during start up.

Just my 2 cents worth...
 

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Sorry for the typo, I meant 'hydraulic rollers " not "solid hydraulics" in my earlier post. I will edit it.

Both solid and hydraulic roller lifters have needle bearings but hydraulics are set with zero lash (no clearance) while solids have to have some amount of lash to account for the expansion of the all the valve train parts on a solid lifter valve train as it heats up to operating temperature.

This results in clearance between the valve train parts on a cold engine with solid lifters but none on a one with hydraulics.



:beers:
 

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That's what I sort of thought you meant. :thumbsup:

I dont know that the cold start up really has much to do with the needle bearings, I think it's more of an oiling issue...or non-oiling maybe I should say. The needle bearing should certainly be made well enough to take very cold temps without any damage. My solid rollers are on the 4th year now with no noticeable wear, so we'll see.:D
 

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Sorry I wasn't very clear on my post. My point had more to do with subjecting the needle bearings to impact loads like those you would get when you have to have clearance in the valve train to account for thermal expansion. Solid rollers work better for racing purposes where you have more frequent inspection opportunities during tear downs and want the best possible valve train movement...but they are going to take a beating on start up. Hydraulic rollers have a little more variablilty due to pump up and so forth but they don't get the impact loading you would get with solid rollers. For street use, I would suggest hydraulic rollers unless somebody makes a solid roller lifter with sleeve bearings ( which they may very well do).

I agree that if you have oiling problems , neither kind of lifter is going last very long.
:beers:
 

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Actually the life of a solid roller on the street is not as long as you would expect. It seems the rollers wipe out after a few years and you should pull the lifters every year or two and see if you can detect one failing.
This is a problem with the oil.
I ran comp solid rollers for years but lost one this past summer along with a lobe on the cam.
I am trying Red Zones this time around with their supposedly superior roller oiling system.
Alot of guys are loosing their comp roller setups like myself
I've been running a solid roller in my Camaro for 7 years and it was my daily driver for the first 4 years. I highly recommend noting which valve(s) needed adjustment each time you check the lash. You can do it in a notebook or use an Excel spreadsheet like I do. Over time it will help identify any valve that requires adjustment more than the others. When you see that pattern you can pull the components on that valve and inspect them.

I was able to identify a roller lifter that was going away before it did any damage. :thumbsup:
 

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Just about every OEM motor has roller lifters in it now from the factory and now go several hundred thousand miles before rebuild. Needle bearings are not the issue. Issue is rate of lobe ramps, spring pressure and RPMs. A 396 basic stock 396 motor with about 220 @ .050 hyd roller will be a very strong street motor. Peak power at about 5600-5700. Use about 325# rate spring set at 140-150 seat. Keep the revs under 6000 to control valve float. It will run forever.
 

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I agree OEMs are all using rollers lifters on their push rod engines...but I don't think any of them are solid rollers.Even the 505 HP Z06 vette uses hydraulic roller lifters.

Hydraulic rollers = no impact loads which results in long life.
Solid rollers = frequent impact loads at cold start resulting in failed bearings. It may look like a lubrication failure but I would wager it is not.

Just about every OEM motor has roller lifters in it now from the factory and now go several hundred thousand miles before rebuild. Needle bearings are not the issue. Issue is rate of lobe ramps, spring pressure and RPMs. A 396 basic stock 396 motor with about 220 @ .050 hyd roller will be a very strong street motor. Peak power at about 5600-5700. Use about 325# rate spring set at 140-150 seat. Keep the revs under 6000 to control valve float. It will run forever.
 

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Hey guys,don't mean to be an ass, but if you can't check the valve lash or occasionally lift the intake to check the roller lifters,then maybe you should stay with hydraulic lifters.I don't like bending at the ,"larger than it was 10 years ago",waist either.But I have to,since I chose a sollid roller.For now anyhow.
I guess this is just my way of being "OLD SCHOOL",in a new age.
 

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I have solid rollers (COmp) in what esentially is a race motor, I would have gone hydraulic in a street motor. Haven't had any problems as of yet, but adjustment is necessary from time to time. After having recently run my car on a chassis dayo, even with the big cam and all, peak power is only 5600 rpm. I'd say go hyd and forget about it.

Devin
 
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