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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anybody drilling a couple holes in there rockers and putting some kind of rust proofing in them, like those little plastic plugs about the size of a nickel or quarter, to plug the hole, sound like a good idea?

Rob
 

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Most definately put some rust proofing in there, whatever you can get ahold of that you can snake in there is better than nothing at all! Personally, I would forgo the plastic plugs though. If you get a good coating of rust preventative in there, you will probably be better off to let any water that will get in there get back out, and I would bet those plugs will not only trap water in there but keep it up against the edges of the metal etc where it seals to. Just make sure to drill those holes around the bottom side where they'll never be seen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Anybody know if there is separation plates inside a 1969 chevelle rocker panel, and a measurement if you know where there located specifically.

Thanks in advance.

Rob
 

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Drilling holes is a BAD idea!! Almost impossible to provide corrosion protection to the backside of drilled hole. There are enough holes and voids in those rocker seems to spray rust fighter.
There are no plates inside those rockers, they are nothing but a open C-channel with the inner rocker closing it off. You can put a spray wand down in the rocker at the kick panels and go ALL the way back to the wheel well.

The best product would be 3M's rust fighter I. Its a self healing wax product that works its way into the seems. Darn near every car on the road today has this type of product in it
 

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When I had my outer wheel houses out for replacement I stuck a shop vac in the rocker & pulled out a ton of crap that was in there. I shot rust proofing in as far as I could.

LK
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I really appreciate everybodys input, but heres what I think I am going to do, drill about four holes in each rocker, use a caliper and get an exact diameter on the plugs, so they fit the hole perfect, then rust proof inside the rocker, then take epoxy and smear it around the inside of the hole, then coat the edges of the plug and put them in, I don't think it will ever rust, if I take my time, also on the trunk drop offs or trunk filler panels, put a hole or two in them, and do the same thing.

They will be up under neath out of sight, kind of.

This car will probably never see any rain.

What do you guys think about this, but don't get upset because I ask for information, and I might not use it, because I really value your opinions. Thanks

Rob
 

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I really appreciate everybodys input, but heres what I think I am going to do, drill about four holes in each rocker, use a caliper and get an exact diameter on the plugs, so they fit the hole perfect, then rust proof inside the rocker, then take epoxy and smear it around the inside of the hole, then coat the edges of the plug and put them in, I don't think it will ever rust, if I take my time, also on the trunk drop offs or trunk filler panels, put a hole or two in them, and do the same thing.
Rob,
My original trunk drop-offs each had a hole approx 3/4" with rubber plug in the back end of them, I assume thats what they were for



There is also roughly the same size hole in the bottom of each rocker (without a plug) just before the outer wheel house. I planned on drilling the same hole in the dropoff and spraying a rust inhibitor in these holes along the inner sides of the cowl.
 

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The best product would be 3M's rust fighter I. Its a self healing wax product that works its way into the seems. Darn near every car on the road today has this type of product in it
Along with the rockers, is this product good for application to any other locations?
 

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Inside of doors, inside 1/4's whatever. wherever.
In other words, will it be gooey, drip or run into areas that are visible?
Can I paint over it?
Down here in the hot Florida sun, I have seen rustproofing start to drip out of door weep holes. I do not want that happening since it is a wax based product I am assuming it can melt?
 

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In other words, will it be gooey, drip or run into areas that are visible?
Can I paint over it?
Down here in the hot Florida sun, I have seen rustproofing start to drip out of door weep holes. I do not want that happening since it is a wax based product I am assuming it can melt?
Can you paint over it NO!!!
When cars are repainted at collision shops they are baked at around 150 degrees. This product doesnt weep out then I doubt it would in the florida sun. Once it has a few days to tack up it doesnt move.

I still think drilling holes is a bad idea. Those rockers are completely open from end to end. You can get inside from the kick panel and completey coat that rocker from there.
A spray bomb of 3M rust fighter I has some really good pressure behind it, it WILL reach the other side of that rocker.

Or you can get the applicator wand from 3M. Its a gun that allows you to spray pretty much anything and comes with about a 4ft long flexible wand. Sata also makes a gun like this. I think the 3M gun is about 40 bucks...Eric
 

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Eastwood sells a kit for this. It comes with the plugs, wands, oil everything you need to inject the oil into your rockers or any other panels. The plug hole will NOT rust IF you rustproof the rockers yearly. Canadians and people in the northern states would know of KROWN or RUSTCHECK which uses a runny seepy oil which gets into all of the cracks and crevices over time. They have been using this type of rust preventative for a long time and it works great. You could use it everywhere... We have all panels on both our cars covered with KROWN. Doors, Hood, Liftgate, Rockers, engine bay and undercarriage and all inaccessible areas. If you plan on keeping the car for a while i't's a good investment. Even for resale value. Up here you could see the differences between the same year car that has been oiled and one that hasn't. Typically an oiled car has no or very little rust while the unoiled car has much more rust (relative to the unoiled). The "candle" type oil which doesn't run can eventually dry out and get hard. The runny oil will drip from everywhere for 3days to a week.
I hope I helped and not confused you more.
Steve
 
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