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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
66 6 cylinder. did a little research on the sender specified for the idiot light style application at a local parts store. it has an "light on" range of 253- 275 degrees:surprise:. Are they kidding? that seems too hot. The engine would be giving me other signs of distress before the light came on.

Summit sells Stewart Warner on/off sending units with as low as 200 degrees.

Am I off base wanting a lower temperature?
 

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when does water boil with the radiator cap PSI
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Regardless of my conception of "too hot" what is a safe point of intervention for our older stock engines?
 

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235-250 is the range i'd look for.. like you said, the engine will show other signs of being too hot long before the light comes on and tge light is only the last resort way to get your attention.
 

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Junk the light and get the gauge.
I agree... If you use an "electrical" gauge, you can buy extra/new insulation/covering and the engine compartment could still look stock (except for maybe at judged shows), then you could feel more comfortable in how warm your car runs... You could even hide the gauge somewhere like the glove box, or on a hinge under the dash (flip it out of view when not in use)...

I understand the feeling of not trusting the idiot lights...

Here is one idea...


https://www.npdlink.com/store/products/pigtail_and_wire_assy_temperature_sender-146411-8.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
A gauge is an excellent idea. a gauge always confirms operation, an idiot light does not. I keep a close eye on things in this current phase of my long restoration; re-commissioning the road worthiness of this car.
 

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In 66 you could get full instrumentation (minus the tach) from the factory on 6-cylinder sport coupe & convertible models in the U.S. The sixes were using a 180 degree thermostat in 66, which changed to a 195 degree stat for 67 with a relocated temp sensor.
 

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1. My '66 had a 283; the temp sender was dual-purpose. Activated the "COLD" light until the engine warmed up a bit, also activated the "HOT" light.
2. KEEP the light(s) as a failsafe. Maybe you're distracted and forget to look at the gauge every ten seconds. The light could save the engine.
3. 250 ain't all that hot for a grocery-getter. 250 or even hotter is not going to damage anything by itself. If the excess heat promotes detonation, that's another story. If it isn't blowing coolant out of the rad cap, or detonating, you're not damaging anything in the short-term. Extended operation could result in oil breakdown.
 
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