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I will check them out out, thanks for the recommendation. I haven't heard of Dave Birdwell but will do some research on him too.
DB = DOCTOR CHEVELLE! all the folks mentioned here so far are expert. Nelson wrote the book!

Great advice, be VERY CHOOSY as to what is done and by whom. This isnt some beater Malibu man.

I met that SS refinishing guy at the MCC ( Maryland Chevelle Club_) show last year. My original stuff needs attention.

Join the NOCC, Northern Ohio Chevelle club. There are a few OFs like me ( well better than) who know their way around a Chevelle. It may be a good idea to get with one of us and then let them help you form an action plan.

I like Bob Tiley's recommendation. Here is a long shot for you, and I am volunteering someone w/o their knowledge ( I was a NCO so!) someone knowledgable, not Chevelles specifically, but near you in Union OH. [email protected]

Send a note to [email protected] , he may know of someone local to you that can give you some time. He is an expert on carburation, and not so bad around engines. Absolutely a stand up individual, gobs of knowledge. He maybe able to give some expert advice , or know of someone local, on the action plan.

 

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Here is the way I see your choices. You could do as several have suggested and just clean it up and drive it. With that choice you can keep it on a the road and tackle one project at a time. That kind of spreads the expense out as well. It also spreads the restoration out to a 10-15 year plan.I have done most projects on my car, including a frame off but would typically plan one or two bigger projects every winter.
Or bite the bullet and get a frame off done with mechanicals at same time. If you can't get one of the Chevelle gurus you can get a good restoration shop but you will kind of have to act as the director. You will have to direct what way you want them to go such as you want such and such parts restored and its OK to replace these parts with repo items. That would require you to have the knowledge to know what needs done even if you are not actually doing it yourself.
One tip or suggestion I can give is the following. When I had my 69 repainted which morphed into a frame off, I removed as many items as I could myself prior to taking it to be painted. I removed, bumpers, all external lights and lenses, all trim and moldings, grill, weather strips and seals, hood louvers, interior panels, passenger seat and rear seat, removed good wheels and tires and put on an old set. These were all items the resto shop would have charged me to remove and reinstall. The stainless trim I obtained a buffer and polished that up myself. You could ship your bumpers off to Tri City Plating to have them rechromed while your car is being painted.
 

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Luther

just curious does the car have power steering? i Can’t tell by picture. Just wondering if it didn’t and you added it would that affect the originality side of things? Just for general knowledge
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
DB = DOCTOR CHEVELLE! all the folks mentioned here so far are expert. Nelson wrote the book!

Great advice, be VERY CHOOSY as to what is done and by whom. This isnt some beater Malibu man.

I met that SS refinishing guy at the MCC ( Maryland Chevelle Club_) show last year. My original stuff needs attention.

Join the NOCC, Northern Ohio Chevelle club. There are a few OFs like me ( well better than) who know their way around a Chevelle. It may be a good idea to get with one of us and then let them help you form an action plan.

I like Bob Tiley's recommendation. Here is a long shot for you, and I am volunteering someone w/o their knowledge ( I was a NCO so!) someone knowledgable, not Chevelles specifically, but near you in Union OH. [email protected]

Send a note to [email protected] , he may know of someone local to you that can give you some time. He is an expert on carburation, and not so bad around engines. Absolutely a stand up individual, gobs of knowledge. He maybe able to give some expert advice , or know of someone local, on the action plan.

I will shoot him an email for sure. I have gotten some excellent advice and a lot to think about. I know I am going to be very particular and micro manage the work. Thanks for the tip on Eric, I will shoot him an email tomorrow.
Luther

just curious does the car have power steering? i Can’t tell by picture. Just wondering if it didn’t and you added it would that affect the originality side of things? Just for general knowledge
No power steering, but its not bad when you get going. I think the steering box could be tightened up a bit though, it is a bit lazy.
Here is the way I see your choices. You could do as several have suggested and just clean it up and drive it. With that choice you can keep it on a the road and tackle one project at a time. That kind of spreads the expense out as well. It also spreads the restoration out to a 10-15 year plan.I have done most projects on my car, including a frame off but would typically plan one or two bigger projects every winter.
Or bite the bullet and get a frame off done with mechanicals at same time. If you can't get one of the Chevelle gurus you can get a good restoration shop but you will kind of have to act as the director. You will have to direct what way you want them to go such as you want such and such parts restored and its OK to replace these parts with repo items. That would require you to have the knowledge to know what needs done even if you are not actually doing it yourself.
One tip or suggestion I can give is the following. When I had my 69 repainted which morphed into a frame off, I removed as many items as I could myself prior to taking it to be painted. I removed, bumpers, all external lights and lenses, all trim and moldings, grill, weather strips and seals, hood louvers, interior panels, passenger seat and rear seat, removed good wheels and tires and put on an old set. These were all items the resto shop would have charged me to remove and reinstall. The stainless trim I obtained a buffer and polished that up myself. You could ship your bumpers off to Tri City Plating to have them rechromed while your car is being painted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
Here is the way I see your choices. You could do as several have suggested and just clean it up and drive it. With that choice you can keep it on a the road and tackle one project at a time. That kind of spreads the expense out as well. It also spreads the restoration out to a 10-15 year plan.I have done most projects on my car, including a frame off but would typically plan one or two bigger projects every winter.
Or bite the bullet and get a frame off done with mechanicals at same time. If you can't get one of the Chevelle gurus you can get a good restoration shop but you will kind of have to act as the director. You will have to direct what way you want them to go such as you want such and such parts restored and its OK to replace these parts with repo items. That would require you to have the knowledge to know what needs done even if you are not actually doing it yourself.
One tip or suggestion I can give is the following. When I had my 69 repainted which morphed into a frame off, I removed as many items as I could myself prior to taking it to be painted. I removed, bumpers, all external lights and lenses, all trim and moldings, grill, weather strips and seals, hood louvers, interior panels, passenger seat and rear seat, removed good wheels and tires and put on an old set. These were all items the resto shop would have charged me to remove and reinstall. The stainless trim I obtained a buffer and polished that up myself. You could ship your bumpers off to Tri City Plating to have them rechromed while your car is being painted.
I have been working on the car on and off the last year and a half but mostly just mechanicals, but we are too the point t we want to get it all wrapped up. You are absolutely right and from what everyone has said I will need to direct the project and not let any restorer run the show. The first guy I talked to was talking about all the motor work he wanted to do, but I think it was kill and that is just one example.
Great insight and you gave me some things to consider removing parts before hand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
Luther

first very sorry for your loss. of course judging by the pictures looks like it don’t need much, but I’m sure it does as you said. Just my suggestion to avoid or limit the body shop jail time, which I don’t know if that matters, I would split restoration up some.
1. One good recommended shop to pull engine and trany out and go thru it as you like. Maybe little head work, few extra ponies never hurts.
2. now that there’s no engine take car to shop that can clean up engine bay (have it towed of course) clean under carriage and chassis. A good place can scrub chassis and rear end and paint the bottom with single stage paint satin finish including eng bay and will look amazing. also have this shop address any floor pan or trunk repairs.
3. Take car back to mechanic to put engine and trany back in, put new u-joints in.
4. got a driving car again. Now go get the car painted, have them remove all chrome trims, any chrome replanting now’s the time. Find a chrome shop and have them give you the parts and you get them plated. Save a ton of time and maybe some mula.
5. seek out a upholstory shop. Might wanna get new carpet, seats redone, maybe headliner.

I know it’s easy to here take the car and see you in 2 yrs…. Oh and here’s $70k or $80k thanks.

yeah I’d micro manage this restoration definitely.
Thanks Nelson, I was hoping one shop could do it all, but I can part out the jobs. I am lucky on the interior all it needs is carpet, console lid and glove box door repaired and A pillar trim color matched. Seats and headliner are mint. The big tasks is finding someone I trust to do all the work.
How are these cars for body mount areas on the frame in the north east rust belt?
I can't really tell by crawling under the car, it was undercoating. That is why I never found the floor pan rust until I removed the carpet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
hello you guys, i have been restoring cars for many years im 72 and getting tired , honestly i did not read all the conversations here what you have to do is say to yourself what do you want to do with the car drive it show it sit in it whatever, was/is this your dads car what was his intention is the car all original, i know how do we know, you look for a reputiable shop who can give you these answers. then go from there the best thing you did was post things on this web site all car guys here to me they are the best. some are just into certain areas some into everything.. so much to plug the site these guys are great and can get you to a person or garage to get you going, my 1970 chevelle SS is all original down to lug nuts and worth 140 k thats just me, the first thing you have to secure many dollars to get this project going to completion.. are all numbers correct on everything unless you know the car from having it since new you will have a hard task ahead of you, and if everything is good you will have a nice high buck car.. unlwss you guys have plenty of cash or skills to repair after its all done, you will be over careful when to use the car you may say your not but you will be, well thats what i have now if you need any ideas guidence let me know i wish you well good luck and happy motoring to you LOU
Lou, thanks for the input. My original fear was going too far and not enjoying the car, but we have decided we are going to do the job right so the couple of generations won't have as many issues to take care of. (I just don't know who will be able to set point gap, dwell and timing for them....lol) We do understand the budget and have taken care of that. If you have any recommendations on what to look for in a good shop I am all ears. Sometimes I feel like some of them are car salemen...lol
 

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I can't really tell by crawling under the car, it was undercoating. That is why I never found the floor pan rust until I removed the carpet.
Dude, I think must have 100 hours on my back ( ok maybe 50-60) scraping that crap off. IT HIDES RUST! Somethings you can;t pay for. Well I can't.
 

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I truly didnt think factory undercoating would do that, but I exposed way too much 'orange'. Nothing " holy" mind you. Now it's good for the next fifty.
 

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To to OP, everyone here has offered excellent advice. Your restoration of your Dad's car will be expensive, no BS. So I'm going to ask and no one has considered this,
What is your Dad's car worth to you, sentimentally? If the car means alot to you and the family, and you wish to pass it down, have it done correctly.
I see in our reply to roadster601 this is what you plan to do. Congratulations on that decision! You won't be disappointed.
 

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To to OP, everyone here has offered excellent advice. Your restoration of your Dad's car will be expensive, no BS. So I'm going to ask and no one has considered this,
What is your Dad's car worth to you, sentimentally? If the car means alot to you and the family, and you wish to pass it down, have it done correctly.
I see in our reply to roadster601 this is what you plan to do. Congratulations on that decision! You won't be disappointed.
thanks jayhawk
 

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If you have any recommendations on what to look for in a good shop I am all ears. Sometimes I feel like some of them are car salemen...lol
Best way to find a good restoration shop is to ask around. Maybe ask at car shows in your area. Ask folks that you can tell their car was restored. If you get a good word on one shop see if you can find someone else that had a good experience with same shop.
I had a frame off done at a shop in Ohio in 2018 but that shop is in northeast Ohio which is several hours from you. Keep in mind you will have to make somewhat regular trips to your chosen shop so location is important.
Think you would want to seek out a restoration shop as opposed to a shop that does collision work. The latter will get you in paint jail.
 

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i agree with brad, for me i like the car that was done from head to toe but doent look like it was done 2 days ago,thats just me
usally the guy who does his own work is either great or great depends whos judging it, also so long the owner is happy and this person knows what good and dung, me i know the difference for others join a car club or clubs you will have a better idea on your car and more of a selection of people make friends along the way and who had things done to there car so you can compare,or do some work yourselves, i feel you both would appreaciate it more, and wont cost so much lol. well good luck and happy motoring
 

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When I needed a resource to paint my 66 - I went to the 2 restoration shops in my area. One was okay. Then one night I was at a local cruise night when I saw a gorgeous 65 Corvette coupe pull in, with very new paint. I followed the car and talked to its owner. Turned out he just finished repainting this car, and that he does car work at his house as his full-time career. (Mostly Corvettes). He has no need to advertise, as word of mouth supplies his workload.
It also turned out that he LOVES the 66 Chevelle, as he has owned a few. I went out to checkout his shop and he came over to checkout my 66 that I had ready to go after my sheet metal replacements. We came to an agreement - he did a fantastic job on my 66 - and we remain very close friends. We now help each other out with car projects, no money exchange needed.

You never know what you'll find out there. You just have to be looking!
 

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When I needed a resource to paint my 66 - I went to the 2 restoration shops in my area. One was okay. Then one night I was at a local cruise night when I saw a gorgeous 65 Corvette coupe pull in, with very new paint. I followed the car and talked to its owner. Turned out he just finished repainting this car, and that he does car work at his house as his full-time career. (Mostly Corvettes). He has no need to advertise, as word of mouth supplies his workload.
It also turned out that he LOVES the 66 Chevelle, as he has owned a few. I went out to checkout his shop and he came over to checkout my 66 that I had ready to go after my sheet metal replacements. We came to an agreement - he did a fantastic job on my 66 - and we remain very close friends. We now help each other out with car projects, no money exchange needed.

You never know what you'll find out there. You just have to be looking!
thats what im talking about, good story
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
I have
When I needed a resource to paint my 66 - I went to the 2 restoration shops in my area. One was okay. Then one night I was at a local cruise night when I saw a gorgeous 65 Corvette coupe pull in, with very new paint. I followed the car and talked to its owner. Turned out he just finished repainting this car, and that he does car work at his house as his full-time career. (Mostly Corvettes). He has no need to advertise, as word of mouth supplies his workload.
It also turned out that he LOVES the 66 Chevelle, as he has owned a few. I went out to checkout his shop and he came over to checkout my 66 that I had ready to go after my sheet metal replacements. We came to an agreement - he did a fantastic job on my 66 - and we remain very close friends. We now help each other out with car projects, no money exchange needed.

You never know what you'll find out there. You just have to be looking!
I have been looking and asking around. It seems like the local area is thin on restoration shops. I may end up in Columbus or Cincinnati at a minimum and that is ok too. Just have to find someone to trust.
Gene, thank you once again for the recommendation.

Luther, I may be able to help you out, and better yet you're in my neck of the woods--I'm just North of Dayton.

My contact info is in my signature line below, give me a shout if you'd
Gene, thank you once again for the recommendation.

Luther, I may be able to help you out, and better yet you're in my neck of the woods--I'm just North of Dayton.

My contact info is in my signature line below, give me a shout if you'd like.

Eric
I actually sent you an email yesterday. I will try to reach out tomorrow, maybe the email didn't go through. Thanks for reaching out.
 

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hello you guys i dont plug any shop to go to, its not how it sounds please dont take it wrong either, to be honest i have done all my work no body paint but ill do every thing else, no plug... i have done over 35 cars and show cars and ever one paid me back well .i dont know how to take it easy, i keep working and going till im burnt, but i dont paint body i think a lot of we car guys are the same, work till the money runs or family does too run out and get some money keep going, in my years doing this restoring thing we love, you meet/make plenty of good friends, many ask do you miss a certain car i say i do i miss every one of them, and yes some unbelviable painters too. all im saying enjoy what your going to do admire it even if its a chrome part or any part, then you can say we did this you will get much satisfaction yea i know i dont spell so good but you get it hey if you need advice im an email away , ok good night from nj and happy motoring to you guys...
 
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