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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a few questions..
I am about to embark on replacement panels for the lower rear quarters on my 66. I AM NOT A WELDER! Everything I've learned I've figured out this year welding in my floor and trunk pans. I figured they would be covered up and really...what was the worst that could happen?? However, welding on the outside has me a bit more nervous. I have read a couple of schools of thought:
1) cut out the section and crimp the existing panel and weld like an overlap style.
2) butt weld.
I'm thinking for my skill level the lap weld will be more forgiving?

Also, I'm unsure of the welding method. Small evenly spaced beads or the small tacks and build from each tack? I'm assuming to space to spread heat, but which method is best.

Also, Who has the best replacement panel prices and quality? I bought my floor pans from a local guy, but I'm thinking NPD for my quarters??
Thanks!
 

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do a search on 1/4 panel replacement you will find a ton of threads on it. I am about to do the same on my 67 and i've spent more time researching on this site about it and got all my questions answered by reading the past threads. Im also a begginer welder and getting much better as I go. Im in the process of smoothing out my firewall and I've had to somewhat started over because of my welding now than it was a when I started.
 

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butt weld! You will be much happier in the end.
 

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I was like you and started on the floor. I welded in new qtr. skins, trunk drops, inner and outter wheelhouses. Also installed a good used trunk section. I had it on a rottisserie and had it on its side many times with no problems with my welds holding. Start tacking in the center and then tack every 6 inches on each side of center until you get to the end. Take your time. Then tack in between the tacks and keep this up until it is completely welded. Take you time and let the metal cool. Taking you time is the key. I used this method and had very little warpage. If your interested it takes about 350 tack welds to fully weld the skin on (I was curious and took the time to count them). There used to be a post on this site where someone had step by step on replacing Qtr skins, which I followed. This was about 2 years ago. I will try to find it.
 

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I am a welder but am considering switching to adhesive for my next quarter panel installation. Welding in a partial quarter panel is a slow and tedious job and can be challenging even for an experienced welder. Unless you are planning on replacing the entire quarter panel, I would recommend gluing it, especially since you are an inexperienced welder. You'll need a tube of panel adhesive an applicator gun and a pile of 1/16" Cleco's to clamp it all together.

http://www.azautobodysupply.com/lordfusor1.html

Tom
 

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I am a welder but am considering switching to adhesive for my next quarter panel installation. Welding in a partial quarter panel is a slow and tedious job and can be challenging even for an experienced welder. Unless you are planning on replacing the entire quarter panel, I would recommend gluing it, especially since you are an inexperienced welder. You'll need a tube of panel adhesive an applicator gun and a pile of 1/16" Cleco's to clamp it all together.

http://www.azautobodysupply.com/lordfusor1.html

Tom
What do you do about the cleco holes once complete? I would take it that they can't be welded up because that would deactivate the glue. Just curious....
 

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you go back and fill the holes with the adhesive. sands like filler and it's water proof.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I am a welder but am considering switching to adhesive for my next quarter panel installation. Welding in a partial quarter panel is a slow and tedious job and can be challenging even for an experienced welder. Unless you are planning on replacing the entire quarter panel, I would recommend gluing it, especially since you are an inexperienced welder. You'll need a tube of panel adhesive an applicator gun and a pile of 1/16" Cleco's to clamp it all together.

http://www.azautobodysupply.com/lordfusor1.html

Tom
What do you do about the thickness of the material "hump" Is there a technical guide to this some where? I've never heard of it.
 

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i figured i would but some input....go really slow with the welding....even spray it with a little water after it isn't cherry red anymore.....as for the adhesive i wouldn't do that...i have seen panels pop off under huge loads....i.e. alot of torque.......if you haven't done it before then i would leave it to a pro there are so many little mistakes that you can do that you wont realize.....and if you leave it to a pro be careful of to who you have do it ...alot of shops don't care and will hack the car up.....thats how you will have a dead strait body........
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
i figured i would but some input....go really slow with the welding....even spray it with a little water after it isn't cherry red anymore.....as for the adhesive i wouldn't do that...i have seen panels pop off under huge loads....i.e. alot of torque.......if you haven't done it before then i would leave it to a pro there are so many little mistakes that you can do that you wont realize.....and if you leave it to a pro be careful of to who you have do it ...alot of shops don't care and will hack the car up.....thats how you will have a dead strait body........
Thanks for the advice, I'm a little skeptical of the body glue also. I'm not interested in a "perfect 10" car where a pro gets to have all the fun. I'm more of a do it yourself (make lots of mistakes) kinda guy. :yes:
 

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What do you do about the thickness of the material "hump" Is there a technical guide to this some where? I've never heard of it.
Screw or Cleco holes are filled with the adhesive and the seam finished with plastic filler. There is hardly a new car on the road today that doesn't use some sort of panel adhesive. Properly applied, the joint will actually be stronger than the metal itself.

Here is a data sheet for the panel adhesive:

http://www.lordfulfillment.com/upload/UI3000.pdf

This is not a new or unproven technology, it's been around for many years.

Tom
 

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Here's another opinion but from someone like yourself. I never welded until I went to tech night school 8 mos ago (i'm 46 yrs old). I replaced floor pans, trunk pans, qtrs, rear wheel wells, qtr to trunk panels and door skins. I will tell you IF you take your time and think thoroughly before cutting and welding, you'll do fine. After you practice on the floors like I did, hopefully you'll feel comfortable enough to take on qtrs

It took 3 qtrs (the $99 skins from OldMuscleCars and NPD) on the drivers side, mainly because I didn't like the look and how the body line fit....

I've got LOTS of pictures on fquick.com under the user name ragtop396 if you want to see the progress.

Also, I'm not favorable about glue; not because it's not a good a solution but because once it dries, it's dry. It also seems difficult to hold in place versus putting some tack welds in place while you fit your panels. Just me....

Again, I'm an IT (technology guy) who never messed with welding, bondo, paint,etc... and I'm about to paint my car; currently block sanding and getting ready.

U CAN DO IT..................................
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Here's another opinion but from someone like yourself. I never welded until I went to tech night school 8 mos ago (i'm 46 yrs old). I replaced floor pans, trunk pans, qtrs, rear wheel wells, qtr to trunk panels and door skins. I will tell you IF you take your time and think thoroughly before cutting and welding, you'll do fine. After you practice on the floors like I did, hopefully you'll feel comfortable enough to take on qtrs

It took 3 qtrs (the $99 skins from OldMuscleCars and NPD) on the drivers side, mainly because I didn't like the look and how the body line fit....

I've got LOTS of pictures on fquick.com under the user name ragtop396 if you want to see the progress.

Also, I'm not favorable about glue; not because it's not a good a solution but because once it dries, it's dry. It also seems difficult to hold in place versus putting some tack welds in place while you fit your panels. Just me....

Again, I'm an IT (technology guy) who never messed with welding, bondo, paint,etc... and I'm about to paint my car; currently block sanding and getting ready.

U CAN DO IT..................................
Thanks for your opinion. Yeah, I'm a desk jockey too. (Mfg engineer) I saw all your pic on the fquick. Nice. I think I'll give it a go with the welding, plan my work and take my time. That seems to be repeated in every statement. I can get ... in a hurry
I saw a resto today on a web site where the person used the epoxy/glue and welded. Looked pretty good once it was finished.
 

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Personally, I wouldn't use glue for patch panels. The glue, metal all have different expand/contract rates which will yield to one seeing ghost lines.

Gluing or bonding full factory panels at factory pinch welds is a totally different animal then bonding a patch panel at a freshly created lap joint running down the middle of a 8ft long panel.

Used in the manner in which it was created I fully believe in glue, but for patch panels at non factory joints welding is your best long term method...Eric
 
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