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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It has been many years since I last pulled an engine. I got a cherry picker and load leveler to do the job. Was going to use an engine plate that bolts to the intake (aluminum) but read a post stating that angling the motor while removing puts strain on the higher area of the lifted plate and possibly cause issues with bolt breakage or pulling out of the threads. It kind of made sense since I would be transferring the majority of weight to the two higher inclined bolts and I'm leaving the bellhousing on when I pull it. Anyway, I've decided to use the 4 chains and attach to the front and back of the upper heads. There appears to be some threaded areas there that I can put bolts in and use. Is this ok or should I use other attachment points? The car is a 70 chvelle with BBC (454) Also, any advice on marking the bolts on the hood when I remove it to make alignment easier when reinstalling? Any other bits of advice relating to this job would be much appreciated. The car body and paint are in great shape so I don't want to muck them up.

Rich
 

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4 chains is a bit overkill, 2 on opposite corners works fine. I don't mark the hood, it's not hard realigning once the 4 bolts are in.
 
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I used the head bolts as you suggested. Worked fine. Some drill small holes for marking the hood and use small nails for alignment but I just took painters (frog) tape and ran it around the perimeter of the hinge plate. Just put it back in the same position...worked fine as well

Thanks. That was one of my ideas as well. Then no drill holes to contend with.
 

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I know plenty of guys use them but I have never been a fan of the plates that bolt to the intake, just my feelings. Your 4 chains with the load leveler sounds like a plan to me. You really shoul not have to tilt it much.
 

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Gosh no one leaves the engine loops on any more...They worked great for GM work great after the fact too. But as you may not have them a plate or a manifold bolt opposite corners works well. and what everyone before me said...
 

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Rich, on the BBCs I always seem to have one accessory bolt hole free on the heads. One end is 3/8 and the other 1/2" maybe? Two different sizes but plenty of shank to use to bolt the chains t the heads. Tilter or not, I usually shorten the front chains up for front-angled lift Not too much as it wont lift off the mounts too easily if it titled too much.

While I get a MONSTER pucker factor with the intake plate, I will tell you that using one allows you to sort of easily remove the engine w/o removing the hood.
 

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So those that don't like using the intake. Is this only with Aluminum intakes? What if your heads are Aluminum?
Heads would be stronger probably because they are made from solid chunks of aluminum. Although if I had aluminum heads I dont think I would risk damaging those, so I would probably go with the carb mounting points. I dont think it would matter on a cast iron Intake manifold carb holes, those are indestructable.
 

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Heads would be stronger probably because they are made from solid chunks of aluminum. Although if I had aluminum heads I dont think I would risk damaging those, so I would probably go with the carb mounting points. I dont think it would matter on a cast iron Intake manifold carb holes, those are indestructable.

Mine are old school Hi Perf rectangular port iron heads, so I'm not too worried if I chain them.

Rich
 

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A number of people use the plates with the four bolts into the intake manifold to lift the engine, so I would never say that it won't work. But like BillK said, I didn't feel comfortable doing that be it aluminum or iron because I'd rather trust four, or even two horizontal 3/8"-16 bolt holes that are in the front and rear faces of the cylinder heads, than four 5/16"-18 bolt holes that are in the intake manifold in a vertical position and are intended for merely mounting the carburetor.

Even if your cylinder heads are aluminum, if they cannot hold up to the task of supporting the weight of the engine, then they would NEVER hold up to the TREMENDOUS forces of the cylinder pressures created by 8 cylinders above 5,000 RPM trying to push the heads right off the engine block. ;)

Here's the way that I do it....( I make sure that I use 3/8"-16 bolts that are long enough to engage ALL the threads in the accessory bolt holes of the cylinder heads and I also use grade 8 bolts which are probably overkill but it's better to be safe than sorry)....

Hood Motor vehicle Automotive design Automotive tire Vehicle


Gas Household hardware Auto part Screw Metal


Motor vehicle Gas Electric blue Engineering Machine




and here below you'll see a 2 by 4 piece of wood that I like to tape in a vertical position to the firewall which acts as a guide to prevent the engine from spinning around on the chains while I line up the bolt holes in the motor mounts with the ones in the frame stands, when I install the engine back into the car. Here I was test fitting the new oil pan I bought to see how it fits the frame.....
Sleeve Wood Gas Electric blue Automotive exterior


Below you'll see the 50 lb and 35 lb dumbells,
I use on top of each of the hoist legs, (again, might be overkill) for keeping the whole thing from tipping over with the engine on it, since I don't have a whole lot of room in my garage, and I therefore have to resort to pivoting the entire hoist with the engine on the hook. I do that by sliding a 4 foot long piece of 2" wide 1/4" thick band iron halfway into one of the engine hoist legs for leverage, so I can then pivot the whole hoist while the engine weight is on it. It works good since I have a Harbor freight hoist which unlike many others, has the front wheels on the legs, on 360 degree swivel casters just like the rear wheels have.

The front wheels being on casters allows me to pivot the whole thing with the engine weight on the hook, and it sure beats trying to grab the engine itself by hand to try and pivot it. That's a good way to topple the whole thing over!!!! I saw a guy do that in a video, and it sure wasn't pretty!!!.....I hope these pics have been helpful.....
Gas Machine tool Machine Auto part Metal



BTW, this is a BBC with a tall deck iron block, so it's just as heavy, (if not heavier) than any other BBC engine.....(short of one with a giant blower on top)..






Motor vehicle Automotive tire Hood Automotive design Rim



Engineering Gas Motor vehicle Machine Auto part
 

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I've done that before as I wont pull the engine with tripower intake on. Great height available when you hook up that low.
 

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Never been a fan of the carb plate either. Never used one. Levelers make it super easy. Remove carb and dist and radiator so they are not damaged. When you raise the engine the front of the car will lift. If you need more height let some air out of the tires. Cradle with wheels or the 4 wheel stand. The T stands can be a little hazardous if the wheels get into a crack. Good idea on the dumbbell weights Gman.
Rick
 
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