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Hey guys. I'm hoping to get my 1970 Malibu painted this summer and would like to do some preliminary planning. I have done a couple scuff and shoot jobs but I have never done a thorough paint job. I was hoping for some input on steps and procedures so I don't do things out of order. Here is my preliminary plan:

1. remove all trim/bumpers/door handles. (Is it common to remove glass?)
2. strip paint from car (aircraft stripper/stripper wheel)
3. epoxy prime
4. tackle all body work
5. epoxy prime
6. 2k prime
7. block entire car/any additional body work

Here is where I'm less confident on the procedures:
8. remove trunk lid, hood, fenders, and doors
9. tape jambs
10. seal, base, & clear jambs/firewall (were the insides of the fenders and hood painted?)
11. Completely assemble car and tape jambs
12. seal, base, and clear

Is this an acceptable method? Is it more common to paint the hood, doors, and fenders separately? I understand that there is no completely right procedure, but if there is a "more" right procedure I'd like to hear about it. Also, I plan on painting the car it's original color, Misty Turquoise. How hard will this be to match? The PPG code is 2168, can I walk in the door to my local PPG dealer and simply give them this number and expect good results? Are there specific instructions/additives required when recreating old finishes? Any help is appreciated. Thanks, guys.
 

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I think your steps 1-7 are sound, and yes remove the glass. I would also do it piece meal, meaning do a fender, strip it prime it etc then move on to the other fender. I would not try to do the entire car at once.

I don't know your color am guessing its a metallic. IMO amateurs are just suited to paint a metallic color with the car assembled. Also matching old metallic colors can be done but IMO never perfect because of the nature in the way the "metallic flakes" were made and are made now. Just because you have a paint code doesn't mean it will match. Case in point a popular burgundy red that GM used in the 2000's had 12-13 alternatives, meaning that paint code with PPG paint had a range of 13 slightly different shades. If you called up the paint store ordered up a gallon of that red, its the correct color just might not be the correct shade of the that color on your car.
 

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Doing a Camaro right now, its a solid (non-metallic) so I can paint pieces as they are ready and then assemble the car later. I mix 1 batch of enough paint to do everything so there's no chance of color variation. This is not advisable with metallics as minute shade differences are likely to occur as each piece is effected by gun angle, air and the way the metallic lays down. You need to paint the entire car to achieve a uniform color.
Depending on your desired outcome, if you base clear the jambs and trunk and fender lips then mask this all then paint the car you'll need to deal with the sharp tape lines at all these edges that will result. If you do it this way I have luck back-scraping these clear ridges with a razor blade within 24 hrs of applying the clear, then wait for full cure and micro buff these lines and they disappear.
If you have a rad shop nearby, check if their tank is large enough to hot tank whatever you can. The shop I use can tank fenders, doors and trunks and hoods. Costs very little and saves a lot of time and mess and you bring home clean metal ready to prime.
 
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