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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just got my 400 sbc back from the machine shop after going thru the initial clean and mag....turns out there's no cracks found! :hurray:
And it's a virgin 400 sbc which means I'm the first to play with it. :beers:

But it may be awhile before I build it. I've been informed to put some oil on some critical areas so it doesn't rust.

So far I've heard I need to put some oil on the cylinder bores as well as the main caps and on the webs where the bearings would typically go.

What about the lifter bores? Should I put some oil on those too?

Where else should I oil so it doesn't rust until it goes back for the bore job?
 

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spray it down liberally inside and out with WD40 and wrap it in shrink wrap.
 

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When I stored my 454, I did a few different things. First, get some rubber gloves and a jug of STP. Using your hands (with the gloves, 'cause taht stuff gets everywhere) and a brush for some points, put the STP on all the machined surfaces. I put it in the bores, mains, pan rails, put it in the cam area as best I could, lifter bores, etc. Then I took some WD-40 and sprayed down the block lightly again. I bought two rolls of the clear plastic rap (the cheap, store brand) and rapped it around the engine. After that, I took a big garbage bag and covered the motor once again, squeezed all the air out of it, then tied it off.

Chris
 

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WD-40 is NOT a lubricant or metal protector, it's a water displacer. It won't stick long enough to use as a storage material. Get a tube of cheap axle grease and a pair of good rubber gloves. Smear grease in the bores, lifter bores, cam bearing bores and mains. Store it on a piece of wood, off the concrete and throw an old blanket or something like that on it just to keep the crap off. If you store it in a bag, you're taking a chance of getting condensation on it.
Best I've ever heart of is a guy that had about 2/3 barrel of used oil. He lowered his block into the barrel and put the lid on it. Ain't gonna rust in there!
 

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I like a product called LPS 3. It's a heavy spray grease, so you can direct it everywhere and not get your hands to dirty but it's heavy enough to cling. I like to store an engine in a bag, unlike wrapping in plastic, all the drips are contained. You can buy a motor bag. They are expensive but won't tear like a garbage liner.

How long is "long term" and how ready is it for assembly? If all the machine work is done and I was only waiting a few months, I'd paint the external surfaces and use engine oil for the insides.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I like the "dunk it in a barrel of oil" idea....if only I had that much oil and a barrel....

Long term may be anywhere from 6 months to a year or better. I've not had any machine work done yet. The shop actually recommended that I wait on that until I have the rotating assembly.

I may be having to move to a different state, possibly even to another continent. Long story made short: the Air Force base I work at is shutting down and they're already starting to cut people orders to other bases.

Which means when they finally give me my relocating orders, I don't even know if I'll have a garage to work on this in, much less the space. So instead I'm going to ask dad if I can store it in his barn until the right day comes.

I've got a can of Valvoline red wheel bearing grease. Guess I could use that?
 

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WD-40 is NOT a lubricant or metal protector, it's a water displacer. It won't stick long enough to use as a storage material.
Incorrect and correct. It is a lubricant and it is a metal protector, and it is a water displacer. But it has nothing to do with sticking.... the volitiles in it will evaporate quickly and then does not protect any longer. It is good for short term but definately not long term. I use grease and suggest using it.

Wikipdeia says:
WD-40 (NASDAQ: WDFC)) is the trademark of a widely used penetrating oil (cleaner, lubricant and anti-corrosive solution) spray. It was developed in 1953 by Norm Larsen (then working for the Rocket Chemical Company) to eliminate water and prevent corrosion on electrical circuitry. It also has many household uses.
WD-40 stands for "Water Displacement, 40th attempt", a name which came from Larsen's laboratory notebook. Larsen was attempting to concoct a formula to prevent corrosion by displacing water, and arrived at the formula on his 40th try.[1] A common myth is that "WD" stands for "war department".
It was first used by Convair to protect the outer skin of the Atlas missile from rust and corrosion. The product first became commercially available on store shelves in San Diego in 1958.
 

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I was wondering if the WD-40 proponents actually have used it successfully. I tried it once after a soap and water washdown- yes, block was completely dried off- and the dang thing rusted up again after a short time even in dry conditions. So I cleaned it up and de-rusted it again and this time wiped it down with motor oil. Yeah. Now that worked.
 

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jd,
I think it really depends on where the block is goint to be stored. The guy that grinds our cranks for us soaks them pretty good with WD40 then puts them in a bag and tapes it shut. I have one or two that have been sitting for 5 years like that with no problem. But .... our shop is heated and air conditioned, kept at about 70 degrees year round.

If you are going to have it stored in a garage or shed that is not heated, it will rust because of the temperature changes and the resulting condensation. Persoanlly, I think a plastic bag is the worst thing under those conditions unless you can put some dessicant packs in the bag.

As far as grease goes ..... your machine shop will hate you for it when it comes time to finish the block. Even the hot tank has a bad time getting that crap off :( There are metal protectant sprays available that will keep the block fresh, yet come off easily when the time comes. Zep has a good one.
 

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How about good old fashioned engine oil. Thats what I did over a year ago with a 454 block sitting in my garage. Poured some fresh oil into a small container and used a rag to dab it on all the cylinders and anywhere else.
 

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My 1970 Camaro RS 350 block has been stored, bored/honed since 1992. I sprayed it with LPS1 a couple times and the key is I have it wrapped in a full sized bath towell and inside a plastic bag that is left open to breath.
The towell absorbs any moisture that it might be subjected to and the bag keeps the dirt/dust/debri off.
I checked it a couple months ago. It's as good as the day I brought it home some 15 years ago.

Years ago when I worked in the machine shop, I turned a flywheel for future use and stored it in a plastic container I bought at Walmart. Like a big tupperware container. I poured in a few quarts of engine oil until it was submersed. It stayed that way a couple years until a guy walked in one day needing one and had a 454 flywheel for exchange. Needless to say it came out for the swap with not a speck of rust. I wasn't going to turn that trade deal down.:yes:

Dawg, get yourself a quart of 40w oil, a squirt bottle and spray it down liberally. Then wrap a towell around it and put a bag over it. If you're worried about mice urine, then use a heavy mil bag and spread some moth balls around/in it.

I did an internet search and found this stuff. Check it out.
http://www.theruststore.com/Boeshield-T-9-12-oz-Aerosol-P3C4.aspx
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanx to all. I ended up putting some 30 weight Shell Rotella oil on the cylinders, lifter bores, saddles and the cam tunnel as best as I could.

I figure when it goes back for the machining the vat can probably get all the oil off.
 
G

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Take it to a car wash and first use the "degreaser sprayer" on it and then wash it w/ the hot water sprayer before you haul her off to the machine Shop!

Plus, I do this to mine after I get it back from the Machine Shop to clean the cylinders real good BUT be warned that you need to wipe them down w/ a clean oily rag b/c they will flash rust right before your eyes and they sure don't look pretty anymore but are FINE!!!

Shocked me the first time I saw them flash rust!!! It's that fast........

pdq67

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