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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I will be wiring up a ford style remote solenoid along with installing my new high torque mini starter (perm magnet). I know that you can't use a jumper from the "S" terminal to the battery cable due to run on problems on perm mags. Here is what I am thinking:

1. Run the positive battery cable from the + battery post directly to the starter as GM did.

2. Mount ford solenoid on firewall. Any suggestions where? Any specific model ford I should use at the auto parts store. I only need the "S" terminal, not both "I" and "S". I am running HEI.

3. Shorten original "S" terminal wire and attach to new solenoid.

4. Run (suggestions on gage, fusible link?) a wire from + battery post on starter to input on new solenoid. I may use the 1/0 cable for this portion since I may hook up accesories in the future.

5. Run (suggestions on gage, fusible link?) a wire from output of new solenoid to "S" terminal on starter.

Comments? Concerns? The idea is to get enough power to the solenoid on the starter, but eliminate running thicker battery cables throughout the engine compartment.

Also, I just recieved my 1/0 welding cable and thinking about using soldering slugs to make the cables vs. crimping.

Let me know what you think.
 

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just put a solid jumper across the two terminals on the solenoid mounted to the starter- it is easy to make using a small piece of sheet metal.
if you want to, i think you can even buy a kit from Summit or Jeg's for a few bucks that is nothing but a steel jumper and a couple of battery cable ends.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
just put a solid jumper across the two terminals on the solenoid mounted to the starter- it is easy to make using a small piece of sheet metal.
if you want to, i think you can even buy a kit from Summit or Jeg's for a few bucks that is nothing but a steel jumper and a couple of battery cable ends.
Derrick,

I can't run a jumper like you mentioned with a permanent magnet high torque mini starter.

Check this out:
http://novaresource.org/starter.htm

I plan to wire like shown on the right diagram except the following would be different:

1. Run + battery cable from battery to starter.

2. Run cable from starter to input on solenoid mounted on firewall.

This way the + battery cable will run in the stock location. The other wire will sneak up the back of the motor to the firewall.
 

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the solenoid has to be inline between the battery and starter on the BIG wire. you just need a jumper from the big post on the starter to the "S" terminal on the starter. use a piece of steel with 2 holes drilled in it or a piece of wire.
the stock wire from the ignition switch gets moved up to the Ford solenoid.
all you are doing is using the Ford solenoid to tun on the power to the starter thru the big cable, which activates the solenoid mounted on the starter at the same time thru the jumper across the terminals.
but if you've got a good battery with good cables and good connections, you shouldn't need to put a Ford solenoid in there.
 

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I ORDERED A KIT FROM MAD ENTERPRISES DIDN'T COST MUCH AND HAD EVERYTHING IN IT. WHY ARE YOU MOUNTING A REMOTE SOLENOID? I DID BECAUSE MY HEADERS WERE WAY TOO CLOSE TO THE STARTER, TOO MUCH HEAT ON THE SOENOID I THOUGHT.:waving:
 

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I will be wiring up a ford style remote solenoid along with installing my new high torque mini starter (perm magnet). I know that you can't use a jumper from the "S" terminal to the battery cable due to run on problems on perm mags. Here is what I am thinking:

1. Run the positive battery cable from the + battery post directly to the starter as GM did.

2. Mount ford solenoid on firewall. Any suggestions where? Any specific model ford I should use at the auto parts store. I only need the "S" terminal, not both "I" and "S". I am running HEI.

3. Shorten original "S" terminal wire and attach to new solenoid.

4. Run (suggestions on gage, fusible link?) a wire from + battery post on starter to input on new solenoid. I may use the 1/0 cable for this portion since I may hook up accesories in the future.

5. Run (suggestions on gage, fusible link?) a wire from output of new solenoid to "S" terminal on starter.

Comments? Concerns? The idea is to get enough power to the solenoid on the starter, but eliminate running thicker battery cables throughout the engine compartment.

Also, I just recieved my 1/0 welding cable and thinking about using soldering slugs to make the cables vs. crimping.

Let me know what you think.
This will work just fine, I've used this setup successfully for years. You don't need to run the high current through the Ford relay, its main purpose is to provide a full current source for the solenoid. The wire in the solenoid circuit only needs to be 12 or 10 gauge, as the solenoid only draws about 8 amps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
the solenoid has to be inline between the battery and starter on the BIG wire. you just need a jumper from the big post on the starter to the "S" terminal on the starter. use a piece of steel with 2 holes drilled in it or a piece of wire.
the stock wire from the ignition switch gets moved up to the Ford solenoid.
all you are doing is using the Ford solenoid to tun on the power to the starter thru the big cable, which activates the solenoid mounted on the starter at the same time thru the jumper across the terminals.
but if you've got a good battery with good cables and good connections, you shouldn't need to put a Ford solenoid in there.
I can't use a jumper with the starter I am about to install. The starter will feed back power to the solenoid energizing it, and will cause the starter to "run on" for a moment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I ORDERED A KIT FROM MAD ENTERPRISES DIDN'T COST MUCH AND HAD EVERYTHING IN IT. WHY ARE YOU MOUNTING A REMOTE SOLENOID? I DID BECAUSE MY HEADERS WERE WAY TOO CLOSE TO THE STARTER, TOO MUCH HEAT ON THE SOENOID I THOUGHT.:waving:
I spoke to Mark at MAD earlier this week, and tried phoning him yesterday. Kept ringing, ringing, and ringing. He was very helpful and knowledgable, but hard to get a hold of!!

At this point, I only have a slow crank issue when hot. My previous setup was a huge style starter with high temp solenoid and 4 gage cables, with ground at alternator bracket. The high torque mini and welding 1/0 gage cables should solve this. I will also move the ground to the engine block.

I was planning on going one step further to solve the other hot start problem, no click, or nothing at all, due to insufficient voltage to the solenoid. I currently don't have this problem and may be better off with the mini and additional clearance it provides. I would like to prevent it if possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
This will work just fine, I've used this setup successfully for years. You don't need to run the high current through the Ford relay, its main purpose is to provide a full current source for the solenoid. The wire in the solenoid circuit only needs to be 12 or 10 gauge, as the solenoid only draws about 8 amps.
Thanks. I'll use a 10ga. wire.
 

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I can't use a jumper with the starter I am about to install. The starter will feed back power to the solenoid energizing it, and will cause the starter to "run on" for a moment.
how will it "feed back" thru the solenoid... never heard of that.
if the Ford solenoid isn't activated, there will be zero power down to the starter. if you have any power wires running down to the starter, you will need to relocate them up to the battery side of the Ford solenoid.
 

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how will it "feed back" thru the solenoid... never heard of that.
.
A permanent magnet DC motor uses permanent magnets to create the magnetic field in which the armature rotates as opposed to a field wound DC motor which uses a field coil to produce this magnetic field. If you spin a permanent magnet motor, it will generate current. If you have the output of the spinning motor connected to a solenoid, it will cause the solenoid to actuate. If the solenoid is actuated, the starter gear is engaged. If the starter gear is engaged, the motor will spin, and this will cause a delay in the release of the solenoid. You won't get this effect as pronounced with the field wound DC motor because the field collapses rapidly as the motor output diminishes.

if the Ford solenoid isn't activated, there will be zero power down to the starter. if you have any power wires running down to the starter, you will need to relocate them up to the battery side of the Ford solenoid.
That's why you run the battery cable direct to the starter and use the Ford relay to control the solenoid. No need to run the high current through two sets of contacts and more connections.
 

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You asked about where to mount the solenoid. Mine is on the firewall immediately below the heater box. In fact, one hole of the solenoid mount bracket is on one of the heater box studs. You stock wiring just gets rerouted to the new solenoid.

I would also suggest soldering your lugs rather than crimping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You asked about where to mount the solenoid. Mine is on the firewall immediately below the heater box. In fact, one hole of the solenoid mount bracket is on one of the heater box studs. You stock wiring just gets rerouted to the new solenoid.

I would also suggest soldering your lugs rather than crimping.
I appreciate your suggestion. I would rather not drill holes in the firewall if possible.

I am soldering the lugs vs. crimping:





I ordered them from http://www.wiringproducts.com/

They have the slugs for the lugs!
 

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I would rather not drill holes in the firewall if possible.
I didn't want to either. What I did was span two of the heater box studs with a short aluminum bracket. Then I used a carriage bolt from the back side of the aluminum bracket for one of the solenoid mounting holes and used the heater box stud for the other solenoid mounting bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I didn't want to either. What I did was span two of the heater box studs with a short aluminum bracket. Then I used a carriage bolt from the back side of the aluminum bracket for one of the solenoid mounting holes and used the heater box stud for the other solenoid mounting bolt.

Thanks. I'll try something similiar. The solenoid has to be grounded, correct? Is yours grounded through the heater box stud/bolt?
 

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I broke down and used a complete kit from Summit. Cost right around 50 bucks. I thought that was very fair.
 

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Thanks. I'll try something similiar. The solenoid has to be grounded, correct? Is yours grounded through the heater box stud/bolt?
It should be, but I think I ran a dedicated ground pig tail because the 67 has a ground screw nearby for the engine ground strap. So I tied into that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
It should be, but I think I ran a dedicated ground pig tail because the 67 has a ground screw nearby for the engine ground strap. So I tied into that.
I just picked up this strap from Napa. I plan to run one end (3/8" bolt hole) from the back of the head or bell housing, and the other to ford solenoid bracket which will be mounted on the firewall. I am eliminating the piggy back wire from the negative battery cable that ran to the fender.
 
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