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1970 Chevrolet Chevelle SS 427 550hp
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Think it might be key switch cause we put a meter on battery and it said to turn car off. It was off???
What meter is saying that to you ?.
The one they put on at Orielys I know it’s sounds stupid. But why would it say that ? He was checking battery when it wouldn’t crank. I dead it was dead . I’ve been having that trouble for awhile now. I did start turning battery off. I put a new alternator on awhile back and just put new starter on the other day.. every now and then it would not start. It made no sound at all when trying. Then sometimes it would crank by next two tries and onetime it took about an hour and it started up. Then last night when At orielys did same thing no sound at all and after we put new battery in. Yes other one was dead even after switching battery off every time I turned car off. He noticed the spark when hooking up neg. Post was larger than it should have been. Then said something was pulling hard. Then looked down and saw wire from battery going to starter was hanging off .Of coarse that’s why we didn’t hear anything at all when I turned engine over. If wire was just loose other times it did same thing but would crank eventually once it took an hour other times it would go from no sound to starting on 2nd or third try, when starting possibly, then damn I might not have even needed new starter. If you understood any of that what do you think??
What meter is saying that to you ?.
 

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Naw man, none if it really makes sense. Yet clearly you have to check all the wiring, a real PITA but at least its the engine harness only , which isn't a big deal. I have read here how to search for a hidden draw. Run a search.
 

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The one they put on at Orielys I know it’s sounds stupid. But why would it say that ? He was checking battery when it wouldn’t crank. I dead it was dead . I’ve been having that trouble for awhile now. I did start turning battery off. I put a new alternator on awhile back and just put new starter on the other day.. every now and then it would not start. It made no sound at all when trying. Then sometimes it would crank by next two tries and onetime it took about an hour and it started up. Then last night when At orielys did same thing no sound at all and after we put new battery in. Yes other one was dead even after switching battery off every time I turned car off. He noticed the spark when hooking up neg. Post was larger than it should have been. Then said something was pulling hard. Then looked down and saw wire from battery going to starter was hanging off .Of coarse that’s why we didn’t hear anything at all when I turned engine over. If wire was just loose other times it did same thing but would crank eventually once it took an hour other times it would go from no sound to starting on 2nd or third try, when starting possibly, then damn I might not have even needed new starter. If you understood any of that what do you think??
The reason I asked is I had never heard of any meter saying to do something but with technology today, I wondered what meter it was to maybe look at and possibly purchase.

I've got an older Fluke meter and it does not talk to me or tell me to do something like "turn car off" and what was used on your car might offer more features and that's why I asked what I asked.

I know we all have had to go to the auto parts store and there was another member here recently that had his alternator tested and then bought a new regulator and was still having issues so myself and others try and help but then find out whomever did the original alternator test was wrong due to either the person operating the machine or the test machine itself having issues.

Electrical issues can be hard to figure out sometimes but stick with it and the issue(s) can be found and corrected.

Throw into the mix intermittent issue(s) and it become even harder to stick with it to figure things out.

Jim
 

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Apologies for being a late arrival on this thread. To do a parasitic amp draw test you need to do the following with the vehicle turned off. This is all documented on YouTube.

Disconnect your negative terminal from your battery. Just the negative. Using a volt meter set for AMPs at a range where you can get to .01 amps, connect the volt meter in series between the negative battery cable and the negative post on the battery. Record the amps being drawn. Lets say it shows .85 amps.

Then start pulling fuses one at a time. In between each fuse removal record the AMP draw on the meter. Put the fuse back and repeat the process with the next fuse and the next etc... When the amps go below .05 you've found the fuse for the circuit that is draining the battery. At that point you can focus your efforts on chasing that circuit. Look for any exposed wires where the insulation is stripped or melted away. Check around corners and or firewall holes and make sure nothing is exposed. If push comes to shove, replace the wiring if you can.

I had a wire exposure on my purple starter wire from the ignition switch to the solenoid. I replaced it and my car has not had a starting problem since. Best of luck.
 

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Just to expand on Duffs67 post, since it's always an unknown as to how much current drain there is and what protection, if any, are on a meter you are using to do an amp draw test is maybe think about putting in a 5A fuse in between the disconnected battery cable end and the battery post and see what happens.

If it blows, then you at least know you have a good deal of draw. If that was the case and a meter was used and it was only capable of handling 5A or less and had no protection on it for handling more than 5A, then at least all you blew was a cheap fuse and not a meter.

If a 5A test fuse did not blow, then it's probably safe to put on a meter to get a reading and probably not damage it BUT all meters are different so know what you have to work with.

Another thing is not all wiring is protected by a fuse in the fuse block. You might take out all of the fuses in the fuse block and still have a current draw and in that case you might have an issue with the alternator, an external voltage regulator, an optional relay or wiring off of the horn relay bus, and such.

Jim
 

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I prefer using a test light, bulbs are cheap.
Yep bulbs are cheap but what do they actually tell you ?.

If it glows, is it a 3A draw ?, or if it glows really bright,it is a 10A draw ?. If you can barely see a glow with the lights off in a dark room is it a 0.02A draw or ???????????

I under stand sometimes using a test light but it has it's limitations.

Jim
 

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Typically meters are unfused at 10A and if your draw is over that goodbye meter.
We want to know if there's a draw and make it zero more than how much it is.
The OP said there are sparks when the battery is reconnected so we can guess the draw is significant.
As a guess I'd probably disconnect the alt or reg and see of it stops. Then pop the engine harness from the firewall connector.
Finally, pop one end of a fuse at a time and then reconnect it.
Then again much of what the OP says is hard to make sense of so they could be a nonnative English speaker.
 
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