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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to paint a shop logo on my c10 doors using brushes , just like an old school hot rod shop or gas station would have had back in the day . I'm certain I could draw what I want on the door then cut it out using frisking paper but would have no idea on how to get it to the other side so I was thinking I could have a set of negative vinyls made and use them as my template .. Anyone have any ideas of a company that would do such a thing ?


Here is what im talking about.
 

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I think most sign shops that do vinyl lettering can do that easily.

Most have computer imaging software and cutting machines.
 

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When the guy put the lettering on our wreckers, he transferred the lettering using butcher paper with some kind of black powder on the back. He drew the artwork on the paper, dusted the back with the black powder using floppy long haired brush, taped the paper to the truck, and traced the lettering with a pencil. He then painted it with a brush. He rested his hand on a rubber tipped stick that he could manipulate with his right hand to help guide his left hand. I bet if you go to a Hobby Lobby type store and ask they could fix you right up with the supplies.
 

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You can get Saral transfer paper. It's cheap, works like carbon paper, comes in different colors, and is reusable. You tape it on the door, draw your lines, and they transfer to the substrate.

Having a sign shop make vinyl stencils is another way, but you won't get the 'hand lettered' feel. There is a light tack 'paint mask' vinyl specifically made for that. Or you can hand cut the mask, weed out the letters, then use a transfer tape to get it on your doors.

You can use your frisket paper. Draw your letters, stick it on, then LIGHTLY cut the letters with an Exacto knife.

You can also Stabilo pencils. They are a water soluble grease pencil that washes off after your lettering is dry. Probably the most used item in a sign shop . . . after a beer opener, of course!

The black powder is charcoal powder. For a dark background,use baby powder. Don't use construction chalk like the blue stuff.

The stick mentioned previously is a mahl stick. Signwriters use them to help stabilize their hand, and to keep from laying into the fresh paint.

Any sign supply house or art supply like Dick Blick will have everything.

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What paint and brushes are you using?

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I've been in the sign business for over 30 years.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You can get Saral transfer paper. It's cheap, works like carbon paper, comes in different colors, and is reusable. You tape it on the door, draw your lines, and they transfer to the substrate.

Having a sign shop make vinyl stencils is another way, but you won't get the 'hand lettered' feel. There is a light tack 'paint mask' vinyl specifically made for that. Or you can hand cut the mask, weed out the letters, then use a transfer tape to get it on your doors.

You can use your frisket paper. Draw your letters, stick it on, then LIGHTLY cut the letters with an Exacto knife.

You can also Stabilo pencils. They are a water soluble grease pencil that washes off after your lettering is dry. Probably the most used item in a sign shop . . . after a beer opener, of course!

The black powder is charcoal powder. For a dark background,use baby powder. Don't use construction chalk like the blue stuff.

The stick mentioned previously is a mahl stick. Signwriters use them to help stabilize their hand, and to keep from laying into the fresh paint.

Any sign supply house or art supply like Dick Blick will have everything.

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What paint and brushes are you using?

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I've been in the sign business for over 30 years.

Thanks a ton for your input . I stripe with Mack and Chico brushes , just little stuff like toolboxes and panels and pizza trays . I am thinking for this project I will need lettering quills of some sort so I will look into that .
 

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Thanks a ton for your input . I stripe with Mack and Chico brushes , just little stuff like toolboxes and panels and pizza trays . I am thinking for this project I will need lettering quills of some sort so I will look into that .
Since you already stripe, you are familiar with paint.

TCPglobal seems to have the best selection of quills, flats, etc. these days. I used to pick out my brushes from an old boy in L.A. who drove around to sign shops with the trunk of his car full of them. Those days are long gone.

Brown squirrel is softer while Grey has more of a snap.

Good luck! :thumbsup:
 

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I've been in the sign business for over 30 years.
as I was reading this I was thinking to myself that had to have been a sign guy, lol...

Another option is, since he's already comfortable doing hand painted stripes, he could have a sign shop do the logo in the low tack paint mask, paint that by hand and then free hand stripe/outline the letters and maybe even do a drop shadow. The hand striped outline and brushed lettering will give the appearance of a hand lettered job. Just a thought...
 

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as I was reading this I was thinking to myself that had to have been a sign guy, lol...

Another option is, since he's already comfortable doing hand painted stripes, he could have a sign shop do the logo in the low tack paint mask, paint that by hand and then free hand stripe/outline the letters and maybe even do a drop shadow. The hand striped outline and brushed lettering will give the appearance of a hand lettered job. Just a thought...
Yep, that's another good idea, and adds the personal touch.

There are so many options and methods. I've silk screened logos on truck doors. Works really well for fleets, but it's a PITA.

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Here's a gag 'sign' I did on the side of my friend's rat rod '50 Chevy:



All paint, even the 'duct tape'! I do wood grain and other faux graphics.





 

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All paint, even the 'duct tape'! I do wood grain and other faux graphics.

Bob, are you serious? That wood grain work is incredible, I'm so jealous... I had a hobby graphics business for a few years, mostly all vinyl but my real love was hand painted lettering. Unfortunately I really wasn't very good at it, lol. It won't be many years from now that there won't be any hand lettering done any longer, it's such a shame too. I guess it will get chalked up to another lost art... But honestly, you're gifted, and don't try to pass it off as 'technique', we both know better than that...

here's a couple of my pieces, oh, and in my spare time I design and build wood gear clocks too. Gotta love retirement... :grin2:
 

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All paint, even the 'duct tape'! I do wood grain and other faux graphics.

Bob, are you serious? That wood grain work is incredible, I'm so jealous... I had a hobby graphics business for a few years, mostly all vinyl but my real love was hand painted lettering. Unfortunately I really wasn't very good at it, lol. It won't be many years from now that there won't be any hand lettering done any longer, it's such a shame too. I guess it will get chalked up to another lost art... But honestly, you're gifted, and don't try to pass it off as 'technique', we both know better than that...

here's a couple of my pieces, oh, and in my spare time I design and build wood gear clocks too. Gotta love retirement... :grin2:
Cool!

I 'retired' about 2 years ago, per SSI, but I'll die with a brush in my hand. Sign guys never give up bad habits!

My last vinyl plotter/cutter (4th one in 27 years) gave out a couple years ago, so I went back to my roots and just do paint these days . . . and love it! Vinyl lettering and signs pay the bills, but it's not fun or creative.

If you were closer to Hollywood, CA than Hollywood, CO. I'd show you how to do the wood grain effect! Takes about 10 minutes for a bike tank or fender.)

It's so easy you'll be pissed you didn't think of it. I 'found' this method by accident. (I can PM you with the easy steps involved.)

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A good reference publication for us is AutoArt Magazine.

https://www.autoartmagazine.com/

autoartmagazine.com

(I've met Bob Bond, the owner/publisher. He dropped by my shop in the '80s. just to BS).

The magazine is filled with artist profiles and their work, references, how-to articles and more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ok some more questions lol

. What brushes do I want? Don't even know how to begin choosing
. How should I make it look weathered?
. Hardener in the 1shot or no ?
 

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Ok some more questions lol

. What brushes do I want? Don't even know how to begin choosing
. How should I make it look weathered?
. Hardener in the 1shot or no ?
Brushes are rather hard to explain. Everyone has their own preferences and favorites, depending on the paint, substrates, etc. I have about 15 stripers, and over 40 lettering brushes, not counting the 75 or so that are too far gone to use but I just can't bear to throw away! :smile2:

I store mine in lard oil, not motor oil or tranny fluid.

Start here: tcpglobal.com/Search.html?query=lettering+brush#/ (Unless you have a sign supply/art supply house in your area.)

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Weathering/aging is up to the user as well. From over thinning or tinting, to scuffing with scotchbrite and windex, adding dirt, airbrushing effects, etc.

Experiment. Thinning with lacquer thinner will make it duller out the gate. If you plan to erode the letters, double coat the outer edges. If you've ever seen natually aged lettering, the edges are usually more prominent, since the artist painted the outlines first before filling them in.

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Hardener is fine, but your image won't age or dull out as fast.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I plan on clearing the truck with matte clear when im all done or maybe give it a few years to let more surface Rust poke through that's why I asked about hardener I was told you can't clear over 1shot if you don't harden it . As far as brushes I guess I'll just order up some lettering quills in different sizes and experiment . I keep my brushes in that Kafka oil
 

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If Steve makes or endorses an oil, it has to be good!

1-shot can be cleared over without hardener, but it's better with it. Depends on the clear and how you shoot it. Start with 3 or 4 light 'tack' coats over the graphics, then clear as usual. I've done it hundreds of times.

If in doubt, always add hardener.
 
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