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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's a good one. I'm using a stock HEI distributor on my '64. Because of the higher current needs of it, I installed a relay to feed it. The relay is "triggered" by the original Ign. wire that fed the coil. The relay switches direct + voltage from the battery to the BAT terminal on the HEI distributor. Car starts and runs fine, but I can't turn it off. Turn the Ign. switch to OFF and it keeps running. If I connect the original coil feed wire direct to the HEI "BAT" terminal it'll run, and turn off and on correctly. During all of this, the alternator is doing its job, but when I switch the key "OFF", the Gen light glows dimly.

Is the resistance of the new relay coil messing with the regulator circuit and keeping the regulator coil engaged? An answer to this is worth a case of brew between me and my neighbor ('69 C10 P/U, he teases me about my 1/2 truck-car morph)
 

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I understand that you installed the relay because the HEI pulls more current, but it really doesn't pull that much more current than the points distributor plus the resistor wire.

It doesn't pull enough to burn your ignition switch. I'd save the relays for other high current accessories. Headlights even.

Now that I've expressed my thoughts, I have to admit that I'm quite puzzled with your dilemma. There's a way to wire a relay to where it will remain engaged even after the switch goes off. This is so momentary push buttons can be used. It takes another button to kill it in this case.

There is also a "latching relay" which would engage with one push of a button, and disengage with the next push of a button. I wonder if you didn't get one of those?

If it's just a normal relay, and it's in good condition and wired properly, you won't get any current from the contactors into the coil. The relay should open when you kill the power to the coil.

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The reason the relay stays engaged is due to the low current it draws. After you turn the key off it stays engaged because of the voltage from the alternator blue/brown field wire. There is enough current to hold the relay in, thus the car won't shut off. A blocking diode stops this. Try it without a relay.
 

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Hi y'all - thought I would tell ya a little story about my unending crisis with the Chevelle SS - for SOME unkown reason she would NOT shut off, even when I had the key right there in my hand, wierdest thing ever.

I looked and looked and could not figure out what was wrong. Now mind you I don't know squat about anything that goes ZAP or BOOM, but I do know what to look for.


This had been going on for about 3 weeks and was really beginning to drive me bonkers. Well, okay. More bonkers than I am already.


When I drive any vehicle I use my headlights...always....day or night. Was trained to do that and I think it stuck.

Was in the driveway and getting ready to attempt to shut her down, turned it off and took the key out, nope....she was still running. Then noticed I had the lights on. Turned them off and VIOLA'!!!
She shut off.
Seems the idiot who wired her up had the ignition wired to the headlights.

Sigh:::shaking head in amazment:: takes all kinds and really makes ya wonder 'eh???

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<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by John_Muha:
The reason the relay stays engaged is due to the low current it draws. After you turn the key off it stays engaged because of the voltage from the alternator blue/brown field wire. There is enough current to hold the relay in, thus the car won't shut off. A blocking diode stops this. Try it without a relay.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

That's another reason why I ditched the OEM wiring and wired my car myself. The ignition is completely isolated from all other circuits. No worries about having an alternator "back-feed" my HEI.




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My Web Page (updated 06-21-02)

"Long Live Freedom!"

Chad Landry
TC Member #643
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'68 El Camino, 357, L31 Vortec heads, 700R4,
8.2 10-bolt, 3.55 gears, Auburn Pro Posi.
 

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Chad
The GM alternators need that voltage to operate.
I believe you run a one-wire but I kinda stay away from aftermarket goodies. Like to be able to fix my driver if it breaks down on the road (and I'm cheap). I know I tell people sometimes to put in a Wells regulator but that's an easy fix over the net and a points unit will go back in there.
 

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This problem has popped up before and usually it means that the alternator or regulator has a defect. I use the HEI+relay with no problems. And no blocking diode.
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by John_Muha:
Chad
The GM alternators need that voltage to operate.
I believe you run a one-wire but I kinda stay away from aftermarket goodies. Like to be able to fix my driver if it breaks down on the road (and I'm cheap).
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I got a couple of "external exciters" from crewboat alternators. Although I'm running a one wire now, I have a spare that I carry with me in case of trouble. The little box (I call it an "external exciter") mounts right on the alternator and plugs into the existing Delco terminals.



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My Web Page (updated 06-21-02)

"Long Live Freedom!"

Chad Landry
TC Member #643
ACES Member #4556
'68 El Camino, 357, L31 Vortec heads, 700R4,
8.2 10-bolt, 3.55 gears, Auburn Pro Posi.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I ditched the relay, replaced the regulator ($13 - cheap insurance) and am running it off the original coil wire to the HEI. Seems to work fine, we'll see at higher RPMs once the car's back on the road. (Neighbor and I agreed it's a wash, and bought eachother a 12'er of our favorite).
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by John D:
I ditched the relay, replaced the regulator ($13 - cheap insurance) and am running it off the original coil wire to the HEI. Seems to work fine, we'll see at higher RPMs once the car's back on the road. (Neighbor and I agreed it's a wash, and bought eachother a 12'er of our favorite).<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Great if you are happy but the original coil wire is a resistor wire meant to drop voltage to the coil. Believe you are sharp enough to understand that this acts like a voltage divider. The HEI likes a full 12 volts and the original resistor wire won't give it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I was thinking along the same lines, and as I've got the harness un-wrapped anyway (to extend the Alt. leads to the other side of the engine), I'm thinking to replace the "resistor" wire with some standard 14-16 ga. copper and go with that. Thoughts?



[This message has been edited by John D (edited 08-05-2002).]
 

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Johm Muha pegged it...YOU NEED A DIODE and dont use the original coil unless you like only about 9.5 volts or so going to the HEI
which needs 12.

Actually you might have spot in the fusebox which has a terminal marked ignition which you may be able to use without the diode. I dont have a diode in mine but I ran my own wiring for the altenator.
I have though had to use the diode on several cars in the past..It works...


[This message has been edited by Importtech (edited 08-06-2002).]
 
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