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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey guys; I recently built a 10x12 wood storage shed to move a bunch of items currently occupying space in the garage. As I'm about to build some shelving, I've been contemplating whether or not I should insulate and sheetrock the shed first.

I'm trying to determine if there is real value in spending money on sheetrock and insulation - not to mention my time installing it all.

My questions as follows:

1. Will insulating the roof and side walls keep the shed cooler in the summer?

2. Will it be noticably cooler, or just a bit cooler (i.e. 5 degrees)?

3. I've read that the only value in insulating a shed would be where one wanted to heat it in the winter months. However, the winters are not my concern; the summer is. Any truth to this statement?

4. There is currently a single static vent near the peak of the roof. Obviously I need an additional vent be it down low or up high; any suggestions? Will there be any negative impacts to these static vents if I install insulation between the roof trusses. Note they are 2x4's (3 1/2" in depth) therefore no 'air gap' would exist between the roof sheeting and the insulation.

Thanks in advance for any and all input.

-B
 

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Brandon. I think insulation and sheetrock will be a waste of money. Put in a couple of vents down at the bottom of the north wall. Sun won't hit there in the summer. As the hot air rises and goes out the top, It will pull cooler air in from the bottom.
 

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Are you planning on spending any real time in there? Like working at a workbench? If not, I wouldn't even bother with insulation. Sheetrock would probably be more for visual without the insulation IMO.

When my house was being built, a project manager stated that 80% of heat loss is in the ceiling, the other 20% is through the side walls. Not sure if that's true or not.

Might want to put one of those vents on the roof that circulate air as the wind blows. Good for ventilation.
 

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Brandon. I think insulation and sheetrock will be a waste of money. Put in a couple of vents down at the bottom of the north wall. Sun won't hit there in the summer. As the hot air rises and goes out the top, It will pull cooler air in from the bottom.
Actually the sun should hit the north side during the summer.
 

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B...if you're going to insulate the roof, put rafter vents under the roof sheathing first. That will allow the air to circulate between the insulation and wood. This will extend the life of your shingles and sheathing. Ideally, if you use the rafter vents you should also install a ridge vent to let that hot air out. Unless you're going to be in there a lot, I would at least add a second gable vent on the other side. Unless you allow the roof to "breath" with rafter vents, you're better off not insulating....
http://www.owenscorning.com/worldwide/canada/products.asp?ProductID=8&Language=1
 

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Actually the sun should hit the north side during the summer.
not unless Cali slid south of the equator.

i wouldn't even bother with any sort of insulation at all. it's just a shed, and all it will do it take up room between studs for things like rakes and shovels..
 

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I slapped some of that Styrofoam board on the ceiling rafters and and on the walls...plus put in a window AC and it has worked great...only negative is that the Styrofoam is pink :confused:
 

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great post and good ideas! :thumbsup:
am getting ready to find someone to do me a small shed so i can get a mower eventually, but no room in garage.
And am tired of having all my yard crap in my yard. LOL
Appreciate the thread!
rachael anne :waving:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all the responses! I am not planning to spend any real amount of time in the shed. I was merely looking to keep the shed from being an oven in the summer and "baking" my stuff -- perhaps this really isn't a concern. My other thought was that the insulation and sheetrock would be a moisture barrier... however, considering there is very little humidity here and it's a wood shed, perhaps this really isn't a concern either.

Stickman; you really honed in on my concern with regard to keeping an air-flow in the rafters with insulation in place. I have absolutely no desire to install rafter vents - so I think this really helps make my decision.

As far as another static vent in the ceiling, are two vents really necessary?



Thanks again to all!!!
-B
 

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B.. I have two sheds I built. One 30x15 woodshop and a 10x12 toolshed. The wood shop is fully insulated, rocked, and rafter vents with ridge vent and eave vents. That stays comfortable all year round, and I spend alot of time in there. The toolshed is bare studs and not insulated, but I added a cheap Anderson window. Just put a gable vent on each peak and open the window...natural air flow will keep your shed good enough for storage...save your money for car parts ( and gas )
 
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