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Discussion Starter #1
I picked up a dash clock for a 71-72. The wire on the windings broke going up to the pos terminal, and solder came loose on the side of one winding. Soldered it back and it worked good (start & stop) for 11hrs 34min 45sec. The winding wire to the pos terminal melted thru again... I unwound it once to get more wire and hooked it up. Burt some other wire thru on the second winding - fixed that - burnt another wire on the other winding....Arrgh...I thought I had this working soo good until it just up and burned out - what gives???

Is there anyway I can fix these windings, or can I buy some new ones???...I'd like to get this one fixed if I can???

Thanks for ANY help on this one


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71-72 Malibu
"I'm high all right, but on the real stuff
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And a shoe shine"
 

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Contact these guys they are very good. They can either re-build your clock to factory specs or replace the insides with a quartz movement.
D&M Restoration

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ccrider
TC #:267
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66 Chevelle SS
My Chevelle
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Discussion Starter #5
Cool...Three good avenues to take. Thanks alot guys, should be able to get'r tick'n again soon.
 

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Usually what happens with these clocks is the contacts pit and stick, sending full battery voltage AND current through the coil. The fuse usually blows, but not before the coil overheats and melts into a nice little blob of copper and plastic. If you catch it in time, before the meltdown, cleaning the contacts and lubing the mechanism with a light clock oil will be all that is necessary to restore operation. The problem with unwinding the coil to reach a "good" piece of wire is that you're lowering the resistance, increasing the amount of current flowing through the coil, and through the contacts, causing them to arc even worse! Kind of a domino effect. A quartz conversion is the only answer, unless you can rewind a new coil on a new form. Hmmmmm.


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MalibuJerry350
TC Member #1279
Original owner '70 Chevelle.
560,000+ miles on car.
Hey, if it's got wheels, DRIVE IT!
My Chevelle: http://hometown.aol.com/erie614/myhomepage/index.html
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You been looking over my shoulder haven't you
. Just found this tid-bit...

Tip: Most manufacturers had the clock on the lighting system circuit which runs on a ten amp fuse. When a car is in storage or the battery becomes weak, there is not enough voltage to kick the relay open, but the battery still has a large amperage. This will burn the windings of most clocks out before blowing the fuse. The cure for this is to install a two amp quick-blow fuse and fuse holder in power feed to the clock so it runs on it's own circuit.

You're right I think I'll look at the quartz conversion. There are two coils in this clock that are wired together, I can't figure it out - Time to call a professional.
 

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I recommend "The Clockworks". They are the only ones I will trust my clocks to from now on. Fast turn-around and excellent warranty. They have replacement coils and also do quartz conversions at a very fair price. Their web site is at www.clockwks.com.

Tell them Helmut sent you!
Good luck!
 
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