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Hey guys. I have been on the forum for a few months now and you all have answered so many questions and I appreciate it greatly. I am posting this to hopefully contribute something instead of just being a mooch that never helps anyone else. I know this has been posted a few times before, but one had detailed instructions but no pics(may have been removed due to age of post) and the other that has the link to ss396.com is black and white and very small. So I figured what the hell. Life is better with pics right??

The reason for my dash removal is that I am rewiring the car with the American Autowire classic update kit and I also have all new autometer gauges as I had the grandma sweep style cluster. I also got a classic dash thunder road carrier(I had a good Christmas!) that fit the autometer gauges. So that being said, I removed the dash with the wiring harness connected-fuse box and dash harness. I left the heating/ac control panel in along with its wiring. So lets get to it.

I don't have pics of the first few things so I will just list them.

Disconnect battery!

Dash pad removal-6 screws facing upwards that run along the underside of the dash pad. 1 of the 6 is inside the glove box. Pretty straight forward.

Emergency brake handle-unscrewing it is the easiest way but you can also take the clip off behind/under the dash panel if you choose.

Headlight switch-after dash pad is out, push the button on the side of the headlight switch and pull the handle out. Then unscrew the metal piece on the dash with a slot in it. I just used a screwdriver in the past. This is not necessary if you are taking the wiring harness out as well.

Radio-mine didn't have one but just pull it out and disconnect the wiring. This is not necessary if you are taking the whole harness out.

Steering wheel-it's not necessary, but some folks say it makes it easier. Obviously a steering wheel puller will be needed if you choose to go this route. I thought it came out easy with the wheel on.

Disconnect the hoses/ducts that go to the vents. The center vent is held in by two screws.

Ok picture time.

Dash frame bolts-all 7/16"

Drivers side upper


Drivers side lower


Passenger side upper. Have to also remove the small bolt in the top of the frame.


Passenger side lower


Center of dash above ac controls


Just above glove box

Steering column. Remove the plastic piece that covers the underside of the column. I think just 4 screws(mine was missing).


Two nuts-I think they are 9/16"(silver ones in pic). When you loosen these, the column is going to drop so be sure to support it. I don't have any seats or interior in, so I used a jack stand. Also unplug the column harness from the main wiring harness.


This was a wire screwed into the column. Not sure exactly what it was, but it came from the instrument panel.

Now that the column is down out of the way, the last dash bolt that is hidden will be exposed. It is also a 7/16".


The job would definitely be a little easier with a helper, but if you don't have one, be sure to support the middle of the dash as best as possible. The weight is mostly at the ends and the dash could crack in the middle.


If you are just pulling the dash without the harness-which I assume is more common, all the dummy lights will need to be unplugged, along with the wiper switch, the cigarette lighter, bulb housing on rear of speedometer, glove box switch, the black ground wire from the back of the instrument panel, and I'm sure there are others I'm missing. Feel free to help me out with the ones I missed.

The two things I forgot until I had the dash in my hands were the courtesy switch wires on both doors and the speedometer cable that goes to the back of the instrument panel. It is held in by a spring clip. What seemed to be easiest for me(because my transmission is out of the car) was pull the speedometer cable from the firewall to get some slack. Seems like this was the only way to do it because the space between the windshield and the back of the instrument panel was too tight to remove it.


At this point, it should be ready to be pulled out. Either get a helper or be careful and lift upwards and out to clear the steering wheel.


Job well done!

By no means am I any kind of expert or ASE tech so I am sorry for anything I missed. My car was already missing a few things that made it easier. This is also my first time posting pics so I will be shocked if this works. Hopefully this will help someone along the way. It's a blast to work on these things. The one thing I have learned is that I am really good at taking things apart. Let's hope it gets back together soon!

Dru
 

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The wire screwed into the column should be spring loaded and it is for the gear select indicator/needle (P N R D 1 2). Nice write up.
 

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1971 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu
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I think the dash pad is held on by the 6 screws like you said but I think there are 2 in the top front of the glove box not 1.
 

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I could have used this last summer....Thanks for the write up...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for pointing out the 2 screws in the glove box Hank. It has been a while since I took the dash pad off as I initially did it because my instrument lights weren't working. After a bit with the multimeter and not much success, I decided right then and there to rewire the car with a modern harness.
 

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nice write-up and pics I could have used it a year ago too ,it was a pain for me to do and even harder to put back together after a year of having it apart
 

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About to do similar job on my 70. Thanks for the write up and pics. One tip I read here is for install. Some guys use some threaded rod in the two outside mounting points. This allows you to slide it in place keeping it there while you get other things attached. Then obviously go back and replace rod with the actual bolts.
 
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