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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Lunati Street heat Chevelle. Anyone else recall this car from the late 90's? It's worse for the wear now, but looks like it could be nice again without too much work.

1971 Chevrolet Chevelle | eBay
 

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It's a car with a great history, having been in several magazines and I find it sad to see how much it's been neglected, like if it has been abandoned...:sad:
I just hope someone who knows about the car's history will bring it back to it's former glory.

Claude.:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So it's a 71 Malibu dressed up as a 70ss. Not too much going for it.
Why would you say that? It's got an interesting history and still looks solid to me. I think it would clean up real nice. Nobody including seller is making any claims about it being a real ss.
 

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The history doesn't mean much, does anyone even remember it? Just because a magazine built it doesn't mean it was done well. I remember seeing the Crusher Camaro at the Peterson automotive museum in the mid-90's, it was a real POS. It looked like some hack amateurs threw it together in some half hearted home build.

It should stand or fall on its ability to be resurrected into a bracket car or grudge night runner.

Steve R
 

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Crazy, I remember that car sitting in the same parking lot at Holley, back when I worked for the car magazines. The engine had already been pulled. This would have been 2002. Sad to see it still sitting there - it was actually a pretty clean car and super clean by magazine-car standards. I threw a couple bids on it, it'd be cool to own it! I think I still have that old BFG poster!
 

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I remember reading about that car. By the mid 1990's I was settled into 64-67 land (I still am). So the different font clip was interesting. It was also when EFI meant a TPI small block and BIG big block was more than a truck motor that had maple spacers for the Mark IV intake.

The winning days of Peterson Publishing when every paragraph mentioned a sponsor -- before social media made it normal.

Shocking to me is how a magazine car and a corporate car could fall into such disrepair. Sarcastically: I thought the peeler paint years ended in the 80's.

Steve: I remember the Crusher Camaro, can you elaborate?
 

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I remember reading about that car. By the mid 1990's I was settled into 64-67 land (I still am). So the different font clip was interesting. It was also when EFI meant a TPI small block and BIG big block was more than a truck motor that had maple spacers for the Mark IV intake.

The winning days of Peterson Publishing when every paragraph mentioned a sponsor -- before social media made it normal.

Shocking to me is how a magazine car and a corporate car could fall into such disrepair. Sarcastically: I thought the peeler paint years ended in the 80's.

Steve: I remember the Crusher Camaro, can you elaborate?
The panel gaps were really bad and you could see several dings and sanding marks in the paint. It shined and would have looked good in pictures, but came across as a rushed paint job in person.

It was a shame, that was the very first magazine project car I had seen in person. I followed the build from the very beginning when they bought the car at one of the first state sanctioned programs where you could sell an older car for emission credits and the car got scrapped. The early 90's was when a lot of car people in California thought there was going to be an expiration date on the ability to drive old modified cars. It was an important car, especially for California residents, back then the state mandated bi-annual smog tests. Any car 1966 and newer had to have all of the original smog equipment that came with the car or a part that was considered equivalent to a factory replacement. Engine swaps had to be inspected and passed by state run facilities. Also, at that point in time cars did not age out of testing.

Steve R
 

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I hate the steering wheel and giant tach but In general I like the car, its certainly worth saving.
 

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Shocking to me is how a magazine car and a corporate car could fall into such disrepair. Sarcastically: I thought the peeler paint years ended in the 80's.
Oh man, you would be surprised. Many of these cars had quickie paint jobs from 1-Day Paint & Body and would look good for 6 months, and then begin to deteriorate. Many of the cars in the Petersen fleet (Cheap Street Chevelle, Crusher Camaro, etc) had had a half-dozen engine swaps, and most of the time the staffers were the ones doing the work, so there was some short-cutting and unfinished work needed to make our deadlines. The cars that the staffers actually owned were typically much nicer, for obvious reasons.
 
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