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I've heard that there is a area where the quarter panels and the roof come together is leaded. Is this true and where is it approximately? Approximately how much is it? Could i just simply weld this area up and smooth with bondo. This is not going to be a street car anymore but want the area to be strong. Remember i'm trying to get ride of as much weight as possible.

Also what dilutes nitric acid? Would plain water be sufficient?

Thanks guys
todd r
 

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This question would probably be best answered by the experts in the body shop fourm,but I can say yes about the lead on the roof to quarter panel area.I actually found little bits of lead around my package tray area when I was replacing it.

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Dean Ciampi
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I am not an expert here, but I think the amount of lead is fairly small, and it is there only to fill in the low spots... Essentially the same as Bondo, only the factory didn't use Bondo back then...
They welded the metal pieces together (spot welding) and used the lead to smooth out the joint.

I can not think of any benefit of removing the lead and replacing with Bondo. I think you'd lose more weight with a few doses of exlax


Plus the dust can be toxic...

I think the old timers (bodymen) will tell you that the lead is better than using Bondo, just that its toxic and maybe takes a little more time and effort that Bondo. Its also hard to find someone that knows how to do this work properly...

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Here is what I have noticed in the past. Cars with vinyl tops had a seam sealer spread across the seam and it was pretty sloppy. Regular cars had lead and if it is still there I would leave it, why breath the stuff in. I would put a coat of bondo over it because it is probably wavy anyway. Next I think you can use distilled water to dillute nitric acid but never add water to acid, instead add the acid to water.
 

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NO! Don't put plastic filler over lead.It will bubble up and cause you problems later.If it is smooth you can leave it,maybe a few ccoats of a good 2k prime and block it smooth.If it's rough,take a propane torch and heat it gently and it will melt away.Make sure its all gone.clean the area good with a grinder or ROLOC disk and then apply all-metal or Duraglass filler,which are waterproof,then finish with regular plastic filler.
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by blue69:
Here is what I have noticed in the past. Cars with vinyl tops had a seam sealer spread across the seam and it was pretty sloppy. Regular cars had lead and if it is still there I would leave it, why breath the stuff in. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

My 69 and 72 both had vinyl tops and had the lead, not seam sealer. They didn't spend much time getting it shaped too well either as both had humps at all 4 corners. I had no choice but to grind down these humps and smooth over with Bondo. I've seen many cars that had the lead completely removed and bondo used in it's place and they had cracks in this area. There must be some flex there?



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Bob (Pa.)

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