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Do any of these extend into the inner area or out to the end. If not then it can be cleaned up.
Edit: Basically if the crack extends to and area perpendicular to the area being ground, it can't be removed, and could continue to crack, ie to a bolt hole. Heat fractures in the middle are common. your machine shop will determine if excessive.
 

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do any of these extend into the inner area or out to the end. If not then it can be cleaned up.
Edit: Basically if the crack extends to and area perpendicular to the area being ground, it can't be removed, and could continue to crack, ie to a bolt hole. Heat fractures in the middle are common. Your machine shop will determine if excessive.
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Is it worth grinding it to see how deep they go, or spending $275 on new billet one? This is not a part to "make do" with unless you drive the car very easy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It just got dropped off for grinding. My guy at the shop said it looks pretty normal and should clean up. We will see I guess . The cracks are about half inch long and only in the a couple spots in the center of the friction surface.
 

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I would take it directly to a grinding shop - not to a drop off auto parts store or an interim machine shop that then takes it to the grinder. The grinder can determine honestly whether it can be safely reground or not - then you can make the decision. Resurfacing flywheels has been successfully done since they were invented. If that specific wheel still meets your needs and can be reground - why not.
 

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I would take it directly to a grinding shop - not to a drop off auto parts store or an interim machine shop that then takes it to the grinder. The grinder can determine honestly whether it can be safely reground or not - then you can make the decision. Resurfacing flywheels has been successfully done since they were invented. If that specific wheel still meets your needs and can be reground - why not.
2x that. I cannot think of a single auto parts store that I would trust to even get the part to a competent shop. Hell I am not sure that an AP store exists where 100% of the counter staff is able to distinguish a flywheel from a brake rotor!

It is not like the old days where in many cases the store had a shop "out back" with a resident machinist. Today things go to some FED-EX / UPS teleported black hole destination ( the machine shop quoting the lowest per unit costs usually ) and then back they come after examination by WHO? I suppose there are good shops affiliated with some AP chains but FWIW I would want to know something about the shop that was looking at a part installed that close to my feet that was spinning at 6500 or more RPM.

Then...suppose they say the f-wheel is terminal. What level of confidence does one have in the over the counter "replacement" that goes in and will soon be spinning at 6500+ RPM?
 

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You dont buy "over the counter replacements" Ray, and you avoid the cheap ChiCom $150 specials, which most full range shops that sell flywheels have as well.

But if it cleans up? Hey, I went billet as I dont run a scattershield. Cheap insurance to me.
 

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You dont buy "over the counter replacements" Ray, and you avoid the cheap ChiCom $150 specials, which most full range shops that sell flywheels have as well.

But if it cleans up? Hey, I went billet as I dont run a scattershield. Cheap insurance to me.
Yes I agree that you don't do that. My point was that in this day and age something like a flywheel is not something to chance to "Acme Machine" / "Unknown Machine Co. Inc" or a part to be replaced with something from "The Peoples Replacement Flywheel Factory #10002 in No Morefeet Province"
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I took it to a reputable Engine Machine shop. Same guy that did my block and crank. Been around forever and knows whats up. All the shops around me use him. I run a Lakewood Scatter Shield with Block plate installed.
 

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Sounds like you took it to a good shop. Like I said, he's the one that will find out how severe. To me it looked normal, be sure to tell him the purpose, he should tell you how much he had to grind. If you have any doubts, your call on replacing it.
If he says it was nominal on the clean up, it's safe, same as a clean up without heat stress cracks. My last one after clean up I notice cracks covered by dust extending into bolt area, it's a grinder stand base now.


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Ron, you have the right protection, and not the 16 oz 621 bell I run. I HAD to get a lightweight billet wheel from Hays, with an oem "paper" bell.
 

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Ron, you have the right protection, and not the 16 oz 621 bell I run. I HAD to get a lightweight billet wheel from Hays, with an oem "paper" bell.
Let me ask an opinion here (sort-of on topic): I have a Hays billet 25# 153 tooth wheel and a Hays "street" clutch. Should I be concerned about installing a Lakewood bell? Car gets driven like a muscle car is supposed to be driven, but it is on plain old street radials. It might see the track once or twice, and maybe drag radials for track outings. 6000 rpm max (rev limiter). Should I be afraid?

I felt OK about a stock bell with a billet wheel, but some of you guys make me nervous....
 

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Let me ask an opinion here (sort-of on topic): I have a Hays billet 25# 153 tooth wheel and a Hays "street" clutch. Should I be concerned about installing a Lakewood bell? Car gets driven like a muscle car is supposed to be driven, but it is on plain old street radials. It might see the track once or twice, and maybe drag radials for track outings. 6000 rpm max (rev limiter). Should I be afraid?

I felt OK about a stock bell with a billet wheel, but some of you guys make me nervous....
My opinion, any stick car with 400 or more HP that gets driven hard on occasion gets a billet wheel and a blow proof bell. Period. Bo.
 

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My opinion, any stick car with 400 or more HP that gets driven hard on occasion gets a billet wheel and a blow proof bell. Period. Bo.
I agree. Having been around when bracket racing a stick was common, I would not build any performance type car without a good flywheel, clutch and bellhousing. Lakewood has a nice steel bellhousing, 77-150. I have it in the Nova. The car will never see the track, but it is a 1/4" steel bellhousing to replace the stock one. It is not sfi certified, but much safer for street beatings. Just in case. I have seen too many "street only" cars still scatter parts.
 

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Novadude, I got that advice from a promod crew chief, a bud of mine, basically, if you're not racing the car, AT THE LEAST, get a new steel billet wheel. If racing , then both wheel and bell. I did get a lakewood bell, but couldnt budge the block dowel pins which were way too short for the bell and the plate, so I put the 16 oz #621 back on there.
 

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I'm dealing with an early Chevy 2 and the 7-o-clock fork bellhousing. Things are tight enough in the tunnel and around the headers without the bulk of a Lakewood. Plus, the slight added length of the autogear case already makes the tailhousing a bit tight on the crossmeber, even with minor crossmember trimming. The added depth of a lakewood and block plate would require some additional modification or a different crossmeber. All reasons I am trying to convince myself that a Billet wheel and a brand name clutch will be fine without a shield. :)
 
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