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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
well i was just wondering what folks out there have experianced what i am doing.

my 93 suburban has a saggy butt on it and i am installing 2" blocks tomorrow to help raise the rear back up.

and i know my front is leaning too on the driver side.

so i leveled the front out.

i have all ready turned the torsion bar on the driver side enough to lift the front 5/8" to equal the pass side.

i made a 1/2 turn on the pass side because i was just alittle higher on the driver side and that 1/2 turn really didnt change nothing but i left it. ( there was no difference in the tape measure )

figure my weight will make my driver side drop some.

but anyway i bought 2" blocks to put in the back tomorrow

i might turn up the front maybe 1/2" more if the blocks looks like there might be to much rake but as it sits now there is about 1 1/4" - 1 1/2" sag in the rear.

so it should have about 1/2" rake i figure when the blocks are in there tomorrow.

but i was thinking the 1/2" more in the front might level it out but im just thinking what might be the side effects for raising the front with torsion bars.

what is the limit on the torsion bars before wheel alignment problems?

i have been reading other post and some folks said they have raised there fronts up to 2" and have no wheel alignment problems

and i am thinking for the most part i put mine back to "stock" and maybe i might go 1/2" more.

my suspension is just tired im thinking i will be o.k.

thoughts are good to read, so let me have it .
 

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Ok, here we go......

IFS trucks suck to lift and are very expensive, too. Cranking up the torsion bars is a band aid to fix a problem, but in the end it creates more new problems. DO NOT raise your truck 2" with the torsion bars. Anyone that told you 2" doesn't change the alignment is lying to you. It may drive down the road straight, but it has negative camber like crazy.
This wears out the inside of the tires, straines the heck out of the ball joints, makes the truck ride like absolute CRAP, and it hard on the torsion bars and adjusters, too.

To fix the saggy rear end, (very common with Subs) it would be better to use add-a-leaf springs. The reason Suburbans sag is the extra weight back there. Blocks will prolong the inevitable. Your weak springs will give some more over time and it will sag again. Add-a-leafs will stiffen the spring pack, give more height and spring capacity to help carry the load. Or just replace the spring packs all together with 3/4 or 1 ton springs. Suspension on a top heavy SUV is NOT the place to cut corners or experiment with jimmy-rigs.

If body roll gets out of hand on that thing, your going over. A broken suspension component and sudden weight shift will spell disaster, too.

......just food for thought.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
great info..... what about using the torsion bars to get back your ride height that was lost over time from just age.

this i think is not an issue, at least from others that i read , because thats what they are ment for to aid in getting proper ride height over time from age and something to do for factory setting the final height.

i dont know for sure just from what im reading.

remember i corrected my height on the driver side. wont this be ok?

so the other 1/2" maybe i was looking for i shouldnt do?

i was using blocks cause they was cheap 20 buck kit from oreilly's
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
well i got the 2" blocks in and i cranked the front up some. it looks good. i might play with the rake on the front some before i take to have the front realigned.

gee i wonder how much more tire i could get under there?

i bought new 265/75-16 mud tires (32") tall

maybe some 285/ 75- 16 might fit nice under there.....mmmmmmmm
 
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