Team Chevelle banner

21 - 40 of 65 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,887 Posts
Now that I got some good and real Argon, my mig welder is pretty good and I can mig weld well. I have 2 tig welders and need practice as I have not used one since high school 50 years ago. Just gives me something else to look forward to mastering. If you like to fabricate, you need to learn how to weld.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,002 Posts
Do any of you guys think it's ok when MIG welding new mild steel suspension brackets to the axle tubes, to do it with the rear end still bolted to the car and filled with gear oil? I know that the ideal way to do it would be to remove the rear and put it in a jig to prevent warping the axle tubes. Some guy I know who welds on the side was telling me that if you "stitched" it a little at a time, and moving from the drivers side bracket to the passenger side bracket with each stitch, giving each area time to cool between stitches, that it can be done without over heating it and warping the axle tubes. I'm a bit skeptical though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
721 Posts
Do any of you guys think it's ok when MIG welding new mild steel suspension brackets to the axle tubes, to do it with the rear end still bolted to the car and filled with gear oil? I know that the ideal way to do it would be to remove the rear and put it in a jig to prevent warping the axle tubes. Some guy I know who welds on the side was telling me that if you "stitched" it a little at a time, and moving from the drivers side bracket to the passenger side bracket with each stitch, giving each area time to cool between stitches, that it can be done without over heating it and warping the axle tubes. I'm a bit skeptical though.
Whoever told you that is correct . I’ve done it a bunch of times . Those axle tubes aren’t going to move . As far as the brackets go make sure you tack one side and jump right to the other side of the bracket while that weld is still hot and tack it that will keep your brackets from “ wanging “ all over the place . You can drain the gear lube if ya want but the tubes will still be saturated in oil even if you do .
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
745 Posts
Do any of you guys think it's ok when MIG welding new mild steel suspension brackets to the axle tubes, to do it with the rear end still bolted to the car and filled with gear oil? I know that the ideal way to do it would be to remove the rear and put it in a jig to prevent warping the axle tubes. Some guy I know who welds on the side was telling me that if you "stitched" it a little at a time, and moving from the drivers side bracket to the passenger side bracket with each stitch, giving each area time to cool between stitches, that it can be done without over heating it and warping the axle tubes. I'm a bit skeptical though.
Never tried it, but if it were me, I'd have some air to blow on it (from a compressor and not cooling with any water) to dissipate the heat after each "stitch". That should help to minimize any heating issues.
 

·
Premium Member
1967 Chevy Chevelle
Joined
·
1,127 Posts
Billy take the time to read into it more before starting so your not wasting your material and consumables. Proper material prep and penetration, type of wire, rod, gas and welding methods are the keys to a strong joint.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,084 Posts
thanks bud ! I’ve only been doing fabrication for about 4 years full time but before that I did body and paint for 10 years . I started tig welding in around 2015 and got heavy into it by 2017 .
Your welding skill is admirable. Always nice to see what proper welds should look like. Nice!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,720 Posts
Discussion Starter #28

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,720 Posts
Discussion Starter #29
Were you surprised at how many amps it took on alum? I was.
My first try was on .060-.065 aluminum, which is like 16 ga. Miller's settings suggest 95 amps. Turns out that is wayyyy too much. 60-65 amps was much better.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,017 Posts
I have the Miller Digital Performance. It came free with the welder. Seems alright once you get the settings dialed in a bit
Probably the same deal. Lots better than the old green view.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,653 Posts
I spent the first 20 years of my life welding and fabricating, mostly mid to heavy structural work with a lot of stick, mig and sub arc welding. I did a little pipe welding but I was a skilled fitter(I could read and understand drawings)so I did more of that than welding, and as time went on, in addition to gaining various plate and pipe welding certifications I became a certified QC inspector and went on from there. I was exposed to tig welding pipe but never did enough of it to get good at it. At home all I have is a little 110v AC wire feed welder for the little projects I've done. I don't have a stick welder or tig setup but I can make a passable tig weld when I can get my hands on the equipment to do it.

Of all the welding processes, tig was the hardest for me to get a good weld but I'm sure if I had put in some more time with it I would be x-rated(pass an xray welder certification)just like I was with stick welding. The one thing I was taught when I started out was to "watch the puddle"! When you have your equipment set properly you can watch the "puddle" of the weld metal/base metal and judge your speed and weld witdh the shape/size of bead you want.

Having been an inspector I have seen it all, including some of the finest completed weldments ever made. And for tig welding, many of the best welders I've seen were women. They seem to have the manual dexterity it takes to "stack dimes" like a coin machine.

So for you guys starting out, first make sure you have the correct equipment for the job and learn how to set it up and adjust it as needed. Then, it's practice makes perfect, and don't be afraid to ask for tips/techniques from any skilled welders you come across.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Clean aluminum seems to make a huge difference.

Figuring out the feed timing for TIG, as well as keeping the arc in a straight line should definitely make for prettier welds. So much happens so quickly when TIGing aluminum.
Use a stainless steel brush for cleaning the aluminum. Do not touch any other material with it. It helps.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,002 Posts
This Eastwood article recommends Lincoln L-50, L-56, and SuperArc L-50 wire for MIG welding. Is that flux-core or solid-core wire? I have a basic 110ac MIG so I won't be welding with gas. I'm told I can only use flux-core wire for that, and a guy I work says that the Lincoln flux-core wire tends to cause less splatter than other brands of flux-core he has used. So that's why this article about the Lincoln L-50 and L-56 wire caught my attention.

Mig Welding Tips - Mig Welding Techniques, Basics - Learn How To Mig Weld (eastwood.com)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,653 Posts
This Eastwood article recommends Lincoln L-50, L-56, and SuperArc L-50 wire for MIG welding. Is that flux-core or solid-core wire? I have a basic 110ac MIG so I won't be welding with gas. I'm told I can only use flux-core wire for that, and a guy I work says that the Lincoln flux-core wire tends to cause less splatter than other brands of flux-core he has used. So that's why this article about the Lincoln L-50 and L-56 wire caught my attention.

Mig Welding Tips - Mig Welding Techniques, Basics - Learn How To Mig Weld (eastwood.com)
Mig welding wire is solid core, the wire you mentioned is solid core mig wire. Your friend could be right, but mig makes nicer looking welds(with less spatter) than flux core. It takes a little skill and experience to get good looking flux core welds but the flux core can be just as strong. Mig welding uses gas for shielding and leaves no slag but some light spatter whereas flux core uses the flux as shielding which will leave slag similar to "stick" welding and yes a little more spatter.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BillyGman

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,002 Posts
Mig welding wire is solid core, the wire you mentioned is solid core mig wire. Your friend could be right, but mig makes nicer looking welds(with less spatter) than flux core. It takes a little skill and experience to get good looking flux core welds but the flux core can be just as strong. Mig welding uses gas for shielding and leaves no slag but some light spatter whereas flux core uses the flux as shielding which will leave slag similar to "stick" welding and yes a little more spatter.
Thanks James. This sometimes can get a little confusing for a newcomer like myself. What I just sorta caught onto here is that welding without gas, using flux core wire technically isn't MIG,(since the G in the term "MIG" stands for gas) however these inexpensive welding machines being sold these days like the one I just bought from Jegs for flux core welding are labeled and sold as "MIG" welders.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
You don't want to see my welding.. I'm a hell of a grinder though!

On a serious note, i can stick metal together and it stay together, but that's it. I admire people that can do it well.

Here's a photo of something i did.
708582
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
898 Posts
Wow... I too just bought a welder as a first timer (Millermatic 215), but have yet to finish setting it up. I also bought the Lincoln Viking series helmet - saw a lot of good reviews on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,566 Posts
Clean aluminum seems to make a huge difference.


I find cleanliness is important in all metals. Probably more so with aluminum which I don’t weld.
The problems I have with MIG on thin sheetmetal. Especially old metal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,645 Posts
I'll tell you guys probably the biggest trick to making nice welds is you have to be able to see. Good Helmut with clean scratch free lenses with a magnifier lens if needed. I sometimes tape a small led light on my helmet if need be
 
21 - 40 of 65 Posts
Top