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I'm getting my trans back this week and my motor is ready. Can anyone give me a link on how to install everything and get up and running? Like does the trans go in first or the motor. Does the flex plate go on w/ the motor or after it is installed? Does the starter go on first or after the engine is in?
I'm sure this has been asked a milion times so if you could give me a link where I can go by a checklist I would be grateful.
 

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It depends on the motor and transmission that you are talking about.

As an example, My car is a 71 chevelle and I installed a small block with a turbo 350 tranny in it. I bolted the engine and tranny together and just stabbed them in at the same time. I had the headers tied up in the engine bay. I bolted in the starter and the tranny cooler line after I sat the motor in. I would also had the radiator out of the car because you will probably need the room. All in all, the motor slid in really easily.

Now I would bet if you were talking about a big block, things would be a little different


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Mark "THE DUDE" Skoch
1971 Malibu
"If you ever reach total enlightenment while drinking beer, I bet it makes beer shoot out your nose."
THE DUDEMOBILE
 

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IMHO you are going to want to install the engine first. You will have to support the back of the motor with a floor or bottle jack while you are installing the tranny. I have usually done this with a piece of 2x4 that spans the oil pan sump (Don't just use the jack by itself or you will be replacing the oil pan and possibly other parts). Definitely install the flexplate to the motor before installing in the vehicle. Don't mess with installing the starter until you have the engine and tranny in. When installing the tranny you can use the bottle jack under the oil pan to adjust the angle between the tranny and engine so that you equalize the top and bottom gap on the mating flanges. Don't force the tranny on and definitely do not pull the tranny up with the bellhousing bolts. The tranny needs to slide easily together with the engine or you will end up damaging something. It can take a while sometimes to wrestle everything around to get it to line up right, but it will simply fall together. If it is a manual transmission, make sure you leave the tranny in gear so that you can rotate the output yoke to help get the splines engaged.

Once everything is installed, make sure you double check all bolts and nuts and line fittings. Spin the oil pump to prime everything and make sure you are getting pressure. Install the distributor (don't install engine with distributor it is flirting with danger, especially with an HEI unit). static time it, and fill up the radiator. Leave the rad cap off for initial break-in. Have a fire extinguisher handy and a friend. You might want to pour a little fuel down the float vents to prime the carburetor so that it fires up right away! When it does fire, keep the RPMs above a couple thousand for the first 20 minutes. Occasionally rev the motor (easily) through the RPM range, but don't let it idle. You might have to have your friend ready to adjust the timing. Also, have your friend check for any leaks while you are breaking it in. After it is broke-in you might want to shut it down and finalize the details. Also it is a safe bet to go ahead and change the oil. If you see any problems when breaking it in...shut it down and fix them first.

After that...take it easy on the motor for the first 1000 miles or so. I know this isn't a checklist, but is pretty much what I do and I haven't had a problem in all 8 motors that I have personally built. I might be missing something here and this is by no means a complete list, but addresses most things that were coming to mind....oh, when installing the driveshaft...don't torque your U-joint bolts to more than 17-18 Lbs.-Ft. It will cause premature failure because the cap will distort and not allow the needle bearings to rotate.
 

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1970 Chevelle Convertible & 1965 Chevelle SS Convertible
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Hi Michael,

I'll try to touch on as many pointers as I can - all from my own wonderful experiences - both big block and small block and various different applications, auto and stick - particularly Chevelles - others can add to whatever I'm missing - ok here goes

I prefer to install the engine and trans as one unit, thus the flexplate must be installed first. It is much easier this way then installing them separately - I have done this many times and both ways - the unit is the way to go.

As far as the engine is concerned I like to install it fully assembled less the fuel pump, starter, carb, dist and alternator. If your installing headers you would want to lay them in the engine compartment. As the engine is being lowered in place you'll then be able to position them - a few helpers is a must here.

As the motor is guided in I have a floor jack handy to support the transmission until I can reposition the trans crossmember.

Once in place, bolt up your motor mounts, install the trans crossmember and move on to the installation of the starter, wires, fuel pump, alternator, belts, etc.

Before installing the plugs and distributor I fill the crank case with oil and I prime the motor turning it a quarter turn for two full revolutions. Once done I bring the motor to top dead center and install the distributor with the rotor pointing to 7:00.

Install the radiator - hook up your hoses and fill with water.

Install plugs, wires carb etc.

Before starting I usually static time the motor - this will get as close to timing as possible, also insure you gap your points in the dist before installing it in the engine.

Also prime the carb as well, make sure there is fuel in it - this will avoid addl cranking.

Hook up all your vacuum lines, re-check all your connections and give it a crank. Once running bring the motor up to 1500 - 2000 rpms for cam break in - run it at that rpm for approx 20 minutes or more.

After 20 minutes or so bring it down - adjust timing, dwell, carb.

It's a little stressful at first - but it's not that difficult. Take your time, double check your work and you should be good to go.

Please - I hope others will add and clarify anything I have advised.

Hope this helps

Rich

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70 SS - L34
Member # 442
ACES # 3480
http://www.my70ss.com
http://www.chevelles.com/feature/index.html

[This message has been edited by richr (edited 08-20-2001).]

[This message has been edited by richr (edited 08-20-2001).]
 

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1970 Chevelle Convertible & 1965 Chevelle SS Convertible
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To static time you need to do the following;

Set the harmonic balancer line to the correct timing mark on your timing tab - if your not sure start with 6 BTDC. Now remove the number one plug. While it is attached to its wire ground the electrode on an exposed piece of metal on the engine.

With the ignition in the on position, gently turn the distributor back and forth until the spark plug sparks. Be careful not to touch the plug, hold it from the rubber boot. You basically want to get the distributor in a position that is as close as possible to the spark. Once there snug the distributor, not tight, and turn the ignition off. Replace the plug. At this point you should be within a few degrees of your desired setting. Once the motor is running use your timing light to set correctly.

I hope I explained this ok.

Thks

Rich

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70 SS - L34
Member # 442
ACES # 3480
http://www.my70ss.com
http://www.chevelles.com/feature/index.html
 

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I agree with richr...installing the engine & trans as one is easier if you don't have a lift. I have a big block/4 speed in my 67 and installed them as one. I'm getting lazy in my old age and didn't feel like laying on my back and stabbing the transmission. Unless you have a transmission jack, I'd think it'd be a bear to get the automatic lined up especially if you don't have access to a lift.

If you have access to an engine tilter, it'll make it much easier as you can start the installation with a severe tilt to the rear and then level it out once the transmission is in the tunnel area.

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Dale McIntosh
TC Gold #92
ACES #1709
www.dalesplace.com
Restore it or customize it, but drive it and enjoy it!
 
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