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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
To replace? I know it's pretty straight forward, my concern is the Distributor what can you tell me? It's a 68 396 with HEI.
Thanks A Lot.

p.s. I have a Holly 750 Dual Feed on it and am thinking the Edelbrock Performer RPM might do the trick, what do you think?

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I the difficulty rating is inversly proportional to one's gearhead knowledge. If your a 2 on the smarts scale, then intake swapping would merit an 8. 10 total of course


Really Saul. it's not too tuff. Jsut put the motor at Top dead center and have rotor pointed at #1 socket, not number six


And please go with the "bead-o-gasket maker" for the front and rear seals. And let it dry good before you crank it over. Help is always a plus, re-dropping that dist. back in may take some "persuading" (aligning, not beating)

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When you tighten the bolts on the new manifold, be sure to follow the torque pattern. Usually starting from the center of the manifold and working in a circle to both ends. The idea is to tighten int down just like you would spread pizza dough. Push too hard in one spot and you have a hole. In this case a cracked manifold. Also pay attention to the torque specs. It is not very much for an intake. 15 - 30 lbs or so.
I have only heard good things about the Performer RPM manifold. I feel it is a good street manifold.

"Bead-O-Gasket Maker" ?


What iz that?

High temp silicone?

I use the orange high temp silicone stuff.

Same thing?


Inquiring minds have to know.



[This message has been edited by 69454Malibu (edited 02-12-2001).]
 

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I had an Edelbrock Performaer RPM on a recent modified Camaro 350 I did up. It is a good dual plane intake and has a wide power band probably from 2500 to 5500 RPM range. Not really suited for maximum power above the 5500. Excellent street manifold.



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We went with the Edelbrock RPM air gap manifold. It really works well and looks good. Some say it's not worth the extra money, but I would say that it is.

When you swap the manifold, like any project, take things off one at a time and put your bolts, washer is lunch sacks and label everything. Really saves confusion when it goes back together if you haven't done this much. When you go back in with the distributor, turn your engine over until the harmonic balancer mark is at 0 Degrees (TDC) and both of the valves on cylinder #1 are closed. If you watch the valves as you approach TDC, you'll see #1 intake close. Stop at TDC after this valve closes and then work your oil pump shaft (connects to bottom and drives the distributor shaft) around to where it will line up with the bottom of the distributor. You'll have to fool with this some to get this in and have the distributor pointing to #1 on the cap. You will have to orient the distributor a little CCW of the desired position as it turns CW (when viewed from above) when it meshes with the cam gear.
Good luck! It's not too bad once you get into it. Be sure you put rags in all the holes while your working so you don't drop anything down in the distributor hole, carb or oil galleys in the heads.
 

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Hey Kevin,

You forgot to mention the all important:
Make sure you remove the rags before re-assembly !! HeHeHe.........been there, done that, "Jesus H **&# why wont this friggin distributer drop down......Doh!

-Greg

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Hi sir, When pulling the old manifold off be very patient.....they don't come off too easy when they've been on for a long time. You may have to use the assistance of a large hammer and a pry bar...but be careful.
 

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The most recent copy of Chevy High Performance Magazine I just received has an article on swapping intakes...it might be useful to you.

JP
 

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Beed-O-Gasket Maker

it's that same thing your thinking about, just high temp Orange (red whatever) RTV sealant. Some people use black for looks, but I chose Red for functionality
 

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Disconnect the battery so no one inadvertently bumps the starter!
 

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Thanks BB_Mike, I feel better now.
I'll put that one in there with BFM.


Dave
 

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Saul,

As gearheads go, I would say I rank way up there around 2
on a scale of 1 to 10 with 10 being an expert mechanic. Last winter I pulled the cast iron intake off my 67 SS and replaced it with Edelbrock Performer RPM manifold. Follow all the advice given above and you won't have too many problems. A couple of other things I would advise you woud be:
* If engine is in car get help pulling old manifold. It is one heavy SOB when leaning over a fender and I damn near gave myself a hernia pulling it out once I tapped it loose.
* Be careful and protect innards when scraping the old gasket material off the heads
* Get some good gaskets. I called Edelbrock and got the ones they recommend. If my memory serves me right they were Fel-pro gaskets and had the recommended blue RTV bead around water jacket holes.I got them from Summit
* If this is a big block you are changing over, be prepared to to have to modify your alternator bracket to get it to work. Again I called Edelbrock and they really had no good reason why the top lug hole is out of position except that the manifold has multiple applications. I brought my bracket into work and had them mill the top hole open some to get it to work.
* Read the instructions that come with the manifold about torqing bolts. Beside following a pattern, apparently some gaskets don't have enough material on the 4 lugs furthest from centerline of engine and so they don't recommend you tourque those for fear of cracking the manifold cuz there is not enough support under it. My gaskets provided the support so I did torque those as normal.
* When putting the distributor back in as indicated above you may need to rotate engine slightly (hand crank) to get it to drop all the way down. When it finally does drop down make sure your rotor is still facing #1. Mine rotated slightly without me noticing it and would not start. I pulled it back up and rotated it slightly and jiggled it until it droppped down and bingo... rotor was facing # 1. It fired right up after this.
* After running engine for a while go back a retorque all the bolts.

So if a novice like me can do the job with virtually no help except I had somebody around when I first fired it up with a big towel in case of backfire and a fire starting in the carb, then I believe most can do it with the proper tools and following the instructions. Knock on wood...but it ran good all year after I got the carburator problems worked out.

Good Luck,


Mytmouse



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67 SS396 350HP 4 sp 3:55 Posi Butternut Yellow w/Black Vinyl
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Mytmouse A.K.A. Robert Stacho
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In case you didn't know, to find TDC easily, I usually take out the #1 plug, put a paper towel in there, and crank until the towel pops out. (You'll hear it.) Check your distributor with the cap off, and if the rotor is facing #1, (As well as the balancer on 0) you're good to yank the distributor. I've found this far easier than just pulling the distributor, and having to find TDC later. This should make it easier to drop the distributor in without having to rotate the engine at all. (Or mess with the oil pump shaft.)
Once you're done bolting everything together, and fire it up, check vacuum. (Or spray some WD-40 or such around the manifold.) This will determine that you have a good seal on the manifold. If the motor revs up, you've got a vacuum leak, and need to pull the manifold back off.
Ain't nothing like a manifold vacuum leak to rob power.

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