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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone recently embarked on this journey? Any tips? I searched the archives and found one thread from 2006. The links in it seem to be working for a horn rebuilding kit. I'm too cheap to buy new horns for $120, but I'll try $30 to rebuild them.

On a different note(pun!), Are there any donors cars you have had luck stealing the horns from? It looks to me like Delco made these until the early 80s.

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they are easy to rebuild. I use to buy the kit from long Island Corvette but they sold out back in August. not sure if you can still buy the kit. LIC sold out to Zip Corvette. the basic horns are very close from most GM cars. it's the welded-on bracket that makes them unique to the car
 

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Try banging your old horns on the concrete. Usually, its a stuck electromagnet or diaphragm and the hits on a hard surface can free it.

For the really stuck horns, I've powered them up to 15-16 volts using a variable power supply to unstick whatever is stuck. If pixie dust smoke comes out, well, it was going in the trash anyway. I'm about 50-50 on success here.

Rick

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Try banging your old horns on the concrete. Usually, its a stuck electromagnet or diaphragm and the hits on a hard surface can free it.

For the really stuck horns, I've powered them up to 15-16 volts using a variable power supply to unstick whatever is stuck. If pixie dust smoke comes out, well, it was going in the trash anyway. I'm about 50-50 on success here.

Rick

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using the adjusting screw is a better method
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Try banging your old horns on the concrete. Usually, its a stuck electromagnet or diaphragm and the hits on a hard surface can free it.

For the really stuck horns, I've powered them up to 15-16 volts using a variable power supply to unstick whatever is stuck. If pixie dust smoke comes out, well, it was going in the trash anyway. I'm about 50-50 on success here.

Rick

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Haha! That's hilarious, Rick. 50-50 ain't too bad.

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
they are easy to rebuild. I use to buy the kit from long Island Corvette but they sold out back in August. not sure if you can still buy the kit. LIC sold out to Zip Corvette. the basic horns are very close from most GM cars. it's the welded-on bracket that makes them unique to the car
Thanks Keith. Zip Corvette website shows them as still for sale.


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I've also tried the screw adjustment method and yes, it also works.

But taking my frustration out is more satisfying using the concrete.

Rick

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I've also tried the screw adjustment method and yes, it also works.

But taking my frustration out is more satisfying using the concrete.

Rick

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Form an old friend who was the best Corvette horn restorer he told me to tap it with a hammer while turning the screw
 

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I just bought the OER replacement horns from Summit that are supposed to be "exact replacement" for our cars.
Guess what? The picture in the ad is taken so that you can not tell that the brackets have a Z bend in them and they don't look right on these cars. Not to mention they have a threaded hole on the end of the bracket instead of a drilled larger hole.
I may try this rebuild kit myself.
 

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Hope it works out for you. Back when I was looking most folks were not happy with the rebuilt horns. You could send them to Gary at The Horn Works and they will come back like new. I went that route and mine are still working and looking like new fifteen years later but it’s going to cost significantly more than $30.00
 
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Hope it works out for you. Back when I was looking most folks were not happy with the rebuilt horns. You could send them to Gary at The Horn Works and they will come back like new. I went that route and mine are still working and looking like new fifteen years later but it’s going to cost significantly more than $30.00
Mine still works after 12 years and the ones dad and I did for his Corvette 20 years ago still works too. So not sure what the benefit is in spending more then 30 bucks. The pleasure of knowing you can do it and it’s easy is what restoring a car is all about
 
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Mine still works after 12 years and the ones dad and I did for his Corvette 20 years ago still works too. So not sure what the benefit is in spending more then 30 bucks. The pleasure of knowing you can do it and it’s easy is what restoring a car is all about
Well I’ll say for $30.00 it’s definately worth a shot. You must have gotten the correct parts. Seems to me there used to be more than one choice for a parts kit.
 

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Well I’ll say for $30.00 it’s definately worth a shot. You must have gotten the correct parts. Seems to me there used to be more than one choice for a parts kit.
We bought our stuff from Long Island Corvette. Now they sold out to Zip. I really can’t think there would be to many people who would make them And I would think the horn rebuilders would buy the same kit.
 

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Try banging your old horns on the concrete. Usually, its a stuck electromagnet or diaphragm and the hits on a hard surface can free it.

For the really stuck horns, I've powered them up to 15-16 volts using a variable power supply to unstick whatever is stuck. If pixie dust smoke comes out, well, it was going in the trash anyway. I'm about 50-50 on success here.

Rick

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I hate letting the smoke out of anything! But sometimes it inevitable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Ok so I split one apart. There's nothing to them! I cleaned the contacts and scuff sanded the diaphragm coil "plug" and it worked! But it sounded like a sad trombone..... Do I need to keep filing the contacts? I assume it's the diaphragm vibrating at a certain frequency that determines the note it plays. But maybe resistance in the circuit, changes (lowers) the current and this the note played? Any experts here?


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both halves have to make good contact to make the circuit
 
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