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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I am a back yard enthusiast not a mechanic by trade so here goes:


There are aluminum hard line AN adapters JEGS sells to adapt a AN fitting onto a steel hard line. These are rated to 55 psi Maximum . Stupid question but here goes. Does that mean in a EFI application (LS1 stock system) this idea of using the stock 3/8 steel lines with these AN adapters is a bad idea cause at over 55 psi they will fail/leak? Ad says "not for use in multi port fuel injection systems"

JEGS Hard-Line AN Adapter Fittings | JEGS

So if that is the case HOW do we run/adapt our stock 3/8" hard lines to a LS motor safely? I see they sell flexible (with press on fittings) hose kits like Russel's kits:

GM LS Engine Fuel Line Kit

Is this Flexible line kit legal at a 1/4 mile track? How do I plumppb a system for my LS equipped car with steel lines then? Thanks in advance!:thumbsup:
 

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I've used them on my wagon. No leaks, no issues system runs at 50 - 58 PSI. I have also flared tubing to fit the 37° to fit the AN fittings.





flared line at the filter

 

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There are high pressure rubber lines that are NHRA approved. You would need to check Russell's catalog to see if this particular hose is considered legal. NHRA doesn't want someone constructing their fuel system with .99 cent a foot parts store fuel line. If you were to use this kit and plan to take it to a track, take a picture of the hose with the part number visible and a screen shot of the portion of the online catalog that states it is approved then show the inspector if they have issues with your line. The odds of being called out for the fuel line is not very high. At most races there is a need to push through a large number of cars in a short period of time, they won't be crawling under a street car to check what sort of fuel line has been installed.

Steve R
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I've used them on my wagon. No leaks, no issues system runs at 50 - 58 PSI. I have also flared tubing to fit the 37° to fit the AN fittings.



This is my main safety concern. Is it safe to do this if the fuel system is regulated at a higher fuel pressure? (58 PSI)? Anyone out there can explain the safety of using a item rated at a lower PSI in a 58 PSI system? The last thing I want is fuel spraying out of a fuel line and onto a hot manifold/header since my hard line ends near the rear of the engine block and a leak there will be fatal to my car....

No disrespect to Phillip ... but those mechanics who do this routinely please reply on the safety of using the AN fittings on the hard line as he did? I'm all for it but the "rated for 55 PSI maximum" quote in the JEGS description makes me nervous and confused. If these fittings are supposed to blow then why is Phillips system not leaking then?

This video is what I searched in Google to show how to install the fittings:

 

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or make a double flare on the end of the line and run a brass or aluminum 3/8" inverted flare to #6 AN fitting.

Keep in mind that any modern deal like that is going to have at a 100% safety factor built in. Maybe 200% if they want to be able to buy product insurance.

In Steve's post just above it appears the guy is installing a brass ferrule fitting, might be why the rating is low. Ferrules are not meant to be used on fuel or brake lines. Some guys have found this out the hard way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Yes, the Russell Twist-Lock hose/fittings are NHRA legal. For a street driven car I would however use as much hard line as I could.
Can you please elaborate on the transition from the Russell Twist-Lock hose to the 3/8 inch hard line? I have plumbed the entire system with Russell Twist-Lock hose/fitting with a kit similar to the JEGS one pictured above about 6 months ago. However I didn't like the way the Russell hose travelled above the exhaust manifolds and would prefer a hard line there. I went to a Good Guys show in Pleasanton November and looked closely and people are running steel lines to the engine compartment with a short flxible hose or steel braided flexible line to the fuel rail.

So then I bought a roll of steel 25 foot 3/8 inch tube and a 3/8 tubing bender and bent my one lines front to rear in steel. I used a fitting like the one in the video to transition from the steel line a short piece of the Russell twist lock hose to the fuel rail on the left side of the motor (its a stock LS-1). Now I'm concerned about that fitting from leaking cause it has a brass Ferrell in it. So that is my new problem... how to connect the 3/8 steel pipe that I ran from the rear that ends by the exhaust manifold (similar to Phillips pic above showing motor/tranny installed on the frame) to the fuel rail on my LS motor. What a pain in the a-- this has become for me. I wonder how people get this part done safely? I've spent over $400 trying to build a fuel system for a stock LS-1 in a 64 Tempest. I feel pretty frustrated now. I'm 52 and this is my first fuel injected project.

Since I'm a novice pictures will help...:thumbsup:
 

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Can you please elaborate on the transition from the Russell Twist-Lock hose to the 3/8 inch hard line? I have plumbed the entire system with Russell Twist-Lock hose/fitting with a kit similar to the JEGS one pictured above about 6 months ago. However I didn't like the way the Russell hose travelled above the exhaust manifolds and would prefer a hard line there. I went to a Good Guys show in Pleasanton November and looked closely and people are running steel lines to the engine compartment with a short flxible hose or steel braided flexible line to the fuel rail.

So then I bought a roll of steel 25 foot 3/8 inch tube and a 3/8 tubing bender and bent my one lines front to rear in steel. I used a fitting like the one in the video to transition from the steel line a short piece of the Russell twist lock hose to the fuel rail on the left side of the motor (its a stock LS-1). Now I'm concerned about that fitting from leaking cause it has a brass Ferrell in it. So that is my new problem... how to connect the 3/8 steel pipe that I ran from the rear that ends by the exhaust manifold (similar to Phillips pic above showing motor/tranny installed on the frame) to the fuel rail on my LS motor. What a pain in the a-- this has become for me. I wonder how people get this part done safely? I've spent over $400 trying to build a fuel system for a stock LS-1 in a 64 Tempest. I feel pretty frustrated now. I'm 52 and this is my first fuel injected project.

Since I'm a novice pictures will help...:thumbsup:
Sorry Steve - I have never done it that way myself...ran the flexible lines all the way from the cell/tank to the engine compartment. I don't have many pictures of the install as I never figured there would be any interest lol, but I'll post/describe what I have.

The latest is the El Camino - I have (2) 6AN lines running from the factory type tank w/efi pump inside all the way to the engine compartment. Lines are secured with cushion clamps high on the frame rail up against the floor pans and above the trans crossmember. To get to the engine compartment the lines are routed thru the frame as indicated by the arrow in the pic below, then up and behind the passenger fender over the inner fender towards the area beside the battery.



In that area under the fender and beside the battery there is actually another small tank w/efi pump inside, but that is another story. This was the best route I came up with for my particular circumstance.





I'll take some more detailed pic's later if you need them.
 

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Now I'm concerned about that fitting from leaking cause it has a brass Ferrell in it. So that is my new problem... how to connect the 3/8 steel pipe
I believe the ferrule type fittings are intended for use on aluminum hard line for carb applications (may be ok with steel line at low pressure as well). I would not use them on steel line, especially with higher pressures (anything over carb pressures). However, a 45 degree double flair adapter to AN would be a good way handle higher pressure (assuming the line is rated for higher pressure). Basically just handle steel fuel line like brake line and you are good to go (steel brake lines routinely handle 1000+ psi).


Just my 2 cents and likely worth less than that
 

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Steve you will have to do what you feel is safe for your car.

I used the same fittings on my Nova with no problems either. That was 8 years ago and the new owner is still driving it with no issues.

I had to remove one of the fittings last week so it could be reused when changing gas tanks. To remove the socket the compression sleeve had to be cut off the line. It had crimped onto the steel line tight. It was cut with a hacksaw blade and spread open to remove.

With the engine running the line pressure stays at about 50 PSI, when the key is on it hits about 58 PSI but only until the relay times out, about 15 seconds or the engine is started.
The water lines in my house have 65psi and the compression sleeve fittings aren't leaking either. I would not use compression fittings on brake lines but know some people that do.
 

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they are rated low because they are compression type fittings and are susceptible to blowing off the line especially on aluminum lines. on steel theyre probably ok. i would use either double flared 45 degree fittings or flared 37 degree an fittings from steel braided hose to hard line. the weak link in such a set up is the hose itself which is rated around 300 lbs
 

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Not scientific by any standards but an interesting video. I personally would have had it behind some type of barrier while testing.

 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I believe the ferrule type fittings are intended for use on aluminum hard line for carb applications (may be ok with steel line at low pressure as well). I would not use them on steel line, especially with higher pressures (anything over carb pressures). However, a 45 degree double flair adapter to AN would be a good way handle higher pressure (assuming the line is rated for higher pressure). Basically just handle steel fuel line like brake line and you are good to go (steel brake lines routinely handle 1000+ psi).


Just my 2 cents and likely worth less than that
Brass SAE 45° Flare x Inverted Flare

Like this then? So connect this to the line in the engine compartment and then from there to the motor run AN fitted Twist lock Hose?
 

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