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Has anyone have any comments about using sound damping material on the floor boards(under the carpet), and also on the inside firewall?

Is there a product that you could roll down and not have to stick it to the sheetmetal? I had to remove this once on a restoration project. Major PITA.


If you have used it do you like or dislike?

I am considering using it but have not used it myself in the past.
 

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Agreed, Dynamat works well, but it needs to stick to the sheetmetal in order to do it's job. I've had to remove small sections and wasn't any big problem. You can cleanup the area with Eastwood's "Pre" paint prep spray or weatherstrip remover.
 

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Here's probably more than you want to know but it helps to understand how to use this material.

There are basically 2 types of "sound reducing" materials. One seeks to eliminate, or minimize the reverberation of the sheet metal to prevent it from re-transmitting or passing sound form one side to the other. This is a sound DEADENING material. The other is insulation that attempts to isolate (read block or insulate) the interior air space from the sound source.

Dynamat is a sound deadening (or dampening)material. It does not need to cover the entire area to kill the vibrations of the sheet metal it's attached to. In fact, you usually can get away with 1 foot (or smaller) squares stuck to each area, I.E. door skins, under each seat, under the foot area. Covering large areas with it would be using it as insulation. It's a little expensive to use as insulation. That's also why it's not sold in large sheets. You really don't need to use it in large sheets for it to be effective. It's easy to prove the effectiveness of a deadening material. Hold a cookie sheet or piece of sheet metal by the corner and strike it with something. It makes a loud sound. Then stick a small piece of deadening material to it. Strike it again. It'll just thud. the material dampens the vibrations, therefore reduces the ability of the sheet to produce sound.

You can get a fairly decent and relatively inexpensive sound insulation material to use in addition to the sound deadening material at home supply centers (read Home Depot, Lowes, etc.) This is a 1/4 inch thick foil surfaced insulation that is used to insulate metal buildidngs. After sticking down squares of the sound deadening material, cover with a layer of this insulation cut to fit the entire area. In addition to assisting with reducing sound, it will also reduce heat transfer (both directions). I've used this method and gotten amazing results in sound reduction.
 

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Thanks for the tip, Herb. Gonna be changing my carpet pretty soon, so I'll check it out at Lowes this weekend


Might also add that you can cut out a lot of high-frequency noise by replacing old and cracked grommets in the firewall, or sealing around them. I was involved in a project for Volvo many years ago, studying these leaks. The intention was to improve the grommets, but we also found that a simple dab of sealer (like silicone) worked very well too.
 

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I know they have it at Home DESPOT. They sell the same stuff at car shows for triple the price. It's still just metal building insulation. The good thing is that it doesn't attract or hold moisture like jute. I used it in a 67 Mustang resto once and it worked great. I just cut it to cove the entire floor area under the carpet. It's also not so thick that it make the carpet install a pain.

Good luck.
 

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Okay, a question about the foil backed stuff. I've seen lots of interiors in process that has the foil to the interior. However I bought a huge roll of the stuff and a note that came with it said to place the foil towards the cold side.
So my question; foil in or out?
 

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Grace Ice and Water Shield looks like it would be a good sound deadening material, which is available at Lowe's for about a third of what Dynamat costs, and it might even be a little thicker. It has a smooth side that would help to repel any moisture on the top side, with an ultra-sticky adhesive on the bottom that once it is stuck on, it isn't coming off!
 

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Here is the site for "Brown Bread": www.b-quiet.com
It sounds as though it is much cheaper than Dynamat, but not as cheap as the Home Depot or Lowe's remedy.
 
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