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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just had my 3rd heart attack last week. I'm 47, never smoked and am in decent shape. First two were 3-4 years ago and I've been taking all medications steadily, maintaining a decent diet, limit alcohol use and stay somewhat physically fit. I've never smoked but have a family history of heart disease.

Two years ago, my liver enzymes were so high, so I had to go off of statin drugs (lipitor) that lowered my cholesterol. I've kept the total cholesterol down about 180 with natural products and a decent diet, but my liver numbers have stayed elevated and I've been dignosed with a simple fatty liver, but my doctors couldn't figure out why my liver enzymes stayed elevated.

I went to see a new doctor last week and we had an hour long question/answer session that had an 'AH - HA!' moment. He asked what I did for a living and that was quickly dismissed. Then he asked what my hobbies are. Playing the drums, raising my kids, Restoring cars, paint, body work.... Whoa! Back up, he says. He asked what solvents, chemicals and paints my body comes in direct contact with. Well. let's see.....Paint, lacquer thinner to wash the paint off, de-greaser, some paint fumes, bondo dust; etc. etc. Doctor says, "You should seriously re-consider your hobbies."

31 days before my last heart attack, I had a routine blood test done with liver enzymes on the high side, but not off the charts. Cholesterol was 185, total. A few days later, I began spraying POR-15 on my chassis and went right into chemical stripping my paint off of the exterior. I didn't feel so good during this time, but kept chugging along.

Last Friday, went to ER. Had another M.I. Damn! My liver enzymes and cholesterol was OFF THE CHARTS! The ER doctor thought I was a major alcohol abuser! She asked me how many bottles of liquor I drank, A DAY! (Two-three beers, tops)

My new liver doctor had me Google the chemicals I've been using along with the word 'LIVER'.
Oh $h!t !!!

I've always used good lung protection while spraying, but have been lax when it comes to lingering fumes, skin contact with paints & thinners, and everything else. Your body readily and rapidly absorbs solvents and fumes, and has a instant and somatic effect on the liver & kidneys. My habits and ways are going to change drastically while finishing this car, which may be my last full body & paint job of my life. So, just a warning; Watch what you use, what you take for granted and don't end up like me with 10 stents in your heart and a bad liver. Protect your body because it's the only one you're going to get.
 

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Hey Jimmy,

Glad to hear your ok, this is a huge reminder to how bad these products can be for us even with skin contact. I am pretty lax with this stuff myself but after reading this I assure you I will be gloving up! I am going to make this a sticky for a while so I can make sure everyone gets a chance to read this. Thanks for sharing!
 

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Thnak you for posting that Jimmy.

I always say, the three most important things when working on your car are:

1. safety
2. safety
3. safety

Sometimes I think, well I don't need the gloves, I'm just going to mix this little bit. We all needa reminder once in a while to keep us focused on what's really important.
 

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Hey Jimmy,

Glad to hear your ok, this is a huge reminder to how bad these products can be for us even with skin contact. I am pretty lax with this stuff myself but after reading this I assure you I will be gloving up! I am going to make this a sticky for a while so I can make sure everyone gets a chance to read this. Thanks for sharing!
Great idea Tom.

What is the most important thing when creating a show winning restoration? Ask this of 100 car guys, and you will get 100 different answers, from straight bodywork to getting all the correct date coded parts. These are all WRONG. The most important thing is SAFETY - because if you are dead, or paralized from the waist down because your car slipped off the jack, or you didn't secure it properly to the rotisserie, or you had respiratory failure becuase you sprayed isocynates without the proper respirator, you won't be around to enjoy the car.

I always tell people that bad things can happen and be over before anyone realizes anything is wrong. In situation where a person is jacking the car, holding it up in the air, on jack stands, standing near things that are spinning (dyno rollers, engines, belts, wheels, etc), lifting things, working under suspended things, you are constantly putting yourself in danger of injury. I see pictures on the internet all the time of cars on cinder blocks, with the blocks being the open kind, turned on their sides, the absolute worst way to place them. People have been killed by situations like that. All it takes is, literally, less than a second of not paying attention, and BAM, a friend or family member is injured or killed.

We did a diving project in Key West a few years back. We had everything all lined up ahead of time. When we arrived, the folks in the dive shop were very low key and quiet. As it turns out, one of their boat captains was killed the day before we arrived. They were headed out with a group of divers. It seems he heard a noise in the engine room and decided to check it out, didn't bother to tie up his long hair, got it caught in the prop shaft, and that was that.

Perhaps we can add a safety forum, or at least a prominent link to a page where the information is all in one place.

This is very important. Every single one of the deaths or injuries involving someone working on a car is 100% preventable.
 

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now you tell me
just did entire floorpan

seriously there was a real good wind blowing and I didn't even smell it.
It's not as bad brushing as it is spraying. Still, it's better not to smell it at all.
 

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Thnak you for posting that Jimmy.

I always say, the three most important things when working on your car are:

1. safety
2. safety
3. safety

Sometimes I think, well I don't need the gloves, I'm just going to mix this little bit. We all needa reminder once in a while to keep us focused on what's really important.
x2,

4. have a liitle fun too!

Sorry to hear about your health Jim. Good Luck.

Kyle
 

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A friend of mine got into restoring cars as a hobby. Very talented guy. After a few short years, he got out of the business entirely for health reasons. Lots of nasty stuff that the body soaks up like a sponge and you really can't get away from it all no matter now safety conscious you are. Even the small amounts add up. Do a Google search "POR 15 health" Lots of isocyanate info.
 

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dam, all those days back in the 60's, spraying laq. and getting high from it, then drink 10 beers to come down, now you tell me it hurts! lol
on a serious note, todays ureth. paints are killers for most hobbiest-i get sick after spraying the stuff-the doctor told me it prob absorbs thru the eyes first-i have pretty much given up painting, unless neces. i wear more throw away gloves now also
about the long haired captain, reminds me when i had a blown 57, blower sticking thru the hood, some long haired freak came up to the car while it was running, stuck his head down close, you guessed it, caught some of his hair and pulled it out-guy walked away screaming, i took off and got the hell out of there, lol
def gotta be safe
 

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Jimmy,
Glad to hear you are doing OK. Thank you for posting as it helps remind us all to work on our cars in a safe and controlled manner.
Frank
 

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I manage a paint manufacturing plant. Safety first. Everyone out there that uses any type of chemicals should get their hands on the Material Safety Data Sheet specific to the chemicals they are using. Ask your supplier for one or look it up on line. Though they have a wealth of info they will also tell you how these chemicals will effect your body! You would be surprised at how little of something can darn near kill you. If you've been using them all your life with little or no protective gear then it's time to read up and get the crap scared out of you. Dave
 

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Is that liver damage permanent? I painted for 20 years, had my hands in the lacquer thinner all the time, painted with the newer paints until I started getting twitchy eyelids allot. I gave it up 10 years ago but I worry that the damage is done already.
 

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Does no one read these things or what? :confused:

POR-15 Directions

POR-15 MSDS Sheet

Says right on the can:

Use POR-15 in well ventilated areas only.
We recommend the use an organic vapor
particulate respirator, NIOSH/MSHA
approved, when applying POR-15. If you are
spray painting, you must use an airsupplied
respirator.
 

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Jimmy:

Thanks soooo much for the heads up. We sometimes forget how important it is to practice safety first! Hope all goes well for you in the future regarding your health!

Durand
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Is that liver damage permanent? I painted for 20 years, had my hands in the lacquer thinner all the time, painted with the newer paints until I started getting twitchy eyelids allot. I gave it up 10 years ago but I worry that the damage is done already.
Luckily our Liver is built pretty tough and can heal itself over time. The liver does a lot of important things for us, so it's important to keep it healthy. Stages of liver disorders are:

Simple Fatty liver - With a few months of caring for it, it will heal up become healthy.

Very fatty liver - Chances are good, but a longer road to recovery

Cirhosis - (many types) Liver contains hardened scar tissue - No recovery, but remaining functioing liver cells can recover if all damage factors are removed from lifestyle.

Lucky for me, I've never had to do body & paint for a living, so my lifetime somatic exposure has been on & off with months in between. However an acute exposure with other existing medical conditions can lead to very bad things.

Also, watch out for welding 'smoke'. I've heard it's bad also, especially galvanized steel.
 
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