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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After running my new 496 w/alum. heads up to temp I soon realized the majority of the exposed head studs I could see were seeping very slightly. I did a search here and realized the ARP teflon sealant I used is not recommended for sealing head studs. I have used this on other BBC's with head bolts and it worked fine, guess not with head studs..

I'm wondering if removing one nut at a time and applying permatex thread sealant or locktight to the threads would be an acceptable fix to this problem. The reason I ask is the water is only coming out between the nut and the stud, not around the the washer area. I would obvoiusly like to avoid removing the manifold and heads if possible.

Thanks.
 

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There is some good block sealers out there made for this problem you can use, most of them require you to add it to the coolant system and run the engine to temp, then let the motor sit . You can find them at Jegs or Summit.
 

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if you want to try some sealer, go the the chevy dealer and get one of the "pellets" they have and drop it in your radiator, after warm up-GM uses them on a lot of alumn. engines-i have used them, and they work pretty good, even stopped up the strainer in my funnel when pouring the drained water back in my radiator-lol
 

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I assume you used the ARP sealant? I had the same problem years ago and will never use it again, I also know several others that had the same issues with it. If you drain your block, remove one stud at a tume and re-seal them with Permatex or another "quality" thread sealer you will be fine.
 

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I was told to glass bead the threads that screw into the block(to remove the black oxide coating), then use red locktite when installing them. You need to tq them before the locktite sets up. This method has eliminated leaks on all the engines my machine shop builds. I know this is a little too late but some others may benefit from it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I was told to glass bead the threads that screw into the block(to remove the black oxide coating), then use red locktite when installing them. You need to tq them before the locktite sets up. This method has eliminated leaks on all the engines my machine shop builds. I know this is a little too late but some others may benefit from it.

After thinking this over I am going to remove one stud at a time and reseal them with the heads on. I would rather not use alumaseal in a new engine if I can avoid it. I wonder if it would make a difference if blue locktight was used instead of red? Does anyone have any experience with permatex thread sealer?
 

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After thinking this over I am going to remove one stud at a time and reseal them with the heads on. I would rather not use alumaseal in a new engine if I can avoid it. I wonder if it would make a difference if blue locktight was used instead of red? Does anyone have any experience with permatex thread sealer?
I was told to use red, I'm not sure if the blue would be alright or not. I don't see a problem doing one at a time though.
 

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I had the same problem with my current 355 when I first built it back in '00. After talking to my machinist he recommended Bars stop leak pellets and it fixed it. Added them and ran it up to temp. I have done several flushes since then with no additional stop leak added and still have 0 leaks.
 

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often these things will clear on their own after a few cycles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I only use Permatex thread sealer it works great and you will not have any leaks. I like the one with the red label/print (high temp).

I went out and bought some of the high temp permatex sealer and it looks a lot like the ARP stuff, that worries me a little. I guess I will give it a try.

Does anyone know what head studs on a 454 block go into water and which ones go into oil? I would rather not mess with the studs going into oil. I am pretty sure all the studs going into oil are under the valve cover.

Also how tight should the studs be torqued into the block?
 

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all the head bolt holes go through to water.

finger tight is the key, don'r try to tighten them up with anything like a double nut. when they stop, stop. If you torque the studs into the block you will crack the block.

You can RTV, just wipe it into the first half of the stud threads. You want it to go down into the threads. You really don't need that much, most of it will end up on the deck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I think the studs are supposed to be just finger tight in the block.
all the head bolt holes go through to water.

finger tight is the key, don'r try to tighten them up with anything like a double nut. when they stop, stop. If you torque the studs into the block you will crack the block.

You can RTV, just wipe it into the first half of the stud threads. You want it to go down into the threads. You really don't need that much, most of it will end up on the deck.
I thought they were only suppose to be hand tight. I thought I read somewhere to lightly tighten them?

Tom, are you saying to put the sealer on the stud or into the block before threading it in?
 

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What about Moroso cerama-seal? Is it any good?
We used the Moroso ceramic sealer on an assembled engine with very good results. It was a little messy, since the ceramic sealer oozed out wherever the water was leaking, but it stopped the leaks. Since then we have gone the lock tite route and not had any more leaks.
 
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