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Discussion Starter #1
Furious with GM! Another dead in-tank pump, no access panel!

If anyone knows the %[email protected]! that came up with the idea of putting the fuel pump INSIDE the fuel tank please do me a favor.
Land three good hard punches on their face, I will send bail!

By my count four out of five cars with the pump in the tank have needed the pump replaced as soon as I bought them.
Not doing it again, sick of it, I'm going "Okie" or "Red-Neck" and cutting the trunk floor.
Car is a 1991 Buick Century with only 107,000 miles one it.
So thirty years old, gutless, and never going to acquire any more value.
Youtube lies, there is no fuel pump access hatch in this model year.
Only bought as a temporary ride until I may get an OLDER car running, the modern trash is just too annoying to put up with.
If this is the Generals best thinking maybe it's a good thing they have announced that they are ceasing production of gasoline powered cars.

EOR, did not want to have to join yet another forum just to rage out on this.
 

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This is just one more example of auto design engineers having a better idea. They seem to get these brilliant ideas even though they have NO practical experience repairing their brilliantly designed cars/trucks. These designers should be required to work for 2 or 3 years in the service bay. I bet they would do things differently.
 

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This is just one more example of auto design engineers having a better idea. They seem to get these brilliant ideas even though they have NO practical experience repairing their brilliantly designed cars/trucks. These designers should be required to work for 2 or 3 years in the service bay. I bet they would do things differently

I swear these engineers gather in a room with there "crayolas" and dream up ways to tick off mechanics or anyone who tries to work on them. oh lets put motor in sideways super tight to make life more interesting in changing rear plugs or timing belt/chain and we will make sure it lasts just long enough till warrenty just expires.

I recall 87-91 alot of GM's infamous with those in tank pumps failing , the lock rings that hold sender unit used to sieze with all crap on top of tank
 

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I totally agree about the access panel. During production it "may" have cost GM perhaps less than $5 - $10 to make a removable panel using Phillips screws and nut plates for removal. Typical engineers though, design it without a thought of the person who will have to eventually work on it. I have owned three Suburbans and two Tahoes, 82-88 and 91 Burbs and a 99 and current 05. Have always wondered why the hell they didn't install an access plate at the production time. Sure would have made mine and many others life a whole lot easier and cheaper.
 

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Bill
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I have never seen an access plate before, glad to hear some have them. I do think the pump should be in the tank. There are a lot of advantages for it being there. I have never let my fuel level drop below 1/4 tank and I have never had a pump failure, knock on wood. When you suck air into any kind of pump it creates cavitation and damage.
 

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1967 Chevelle Wagon
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Here's what kills intank electric fuel pumps:
Driving low on fuel ( the fuel in the tank cools thee pump)
Restricted fuel filter ( clogged with crap from that cheap fuel someone put in there) It gets tired of trying to push fuel through it.
 

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Definitely poor engineering. Every manufacturer does it. I’m a firm believer that engineers and designers should spend a week of every month in the shop of their brand. Not as specialists, but as the guy who actually has to turn the wrench to fix stuff, day in and day out.

Devin
 

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Discussion Starter #11
In my experience another thing that kills them is just plain sitting, and not necessarily for a long time.
I had a Chevy 1500 1/2 ton, dead pump after sitting a few years, with a full tank.
This car probably sat for a few months while the estate was settled, I got about five hundred miles out of it before the pump died today.
I'm done, no more of these, ever.
 

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I don’t think a pump that made it 30 years/100k miles would be considered bad engineering.

one thing a lot of people don’t realize is that age not just mileage becomes an issue with vehicles.
 

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I don’t think a pump that made it 30 years/100k miles would be considered bad engineering.
one thing a lot of people don’t realize is that age not just mileage becomes an issue with vehicles.
I do not think it is about the Pump dieing

I think it is about there not being a Access Panel to get at the Pump to Replace it
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Exactly right!
This will be the Ninth time I will have replaced a lousy in-tank pump.
Out of Eleven vehicles that used them.
Only a Honda and a Range Rover ever had an access panel, the Ford truck I did required new pumps for each tank, and both had to be dropped.
In the beginning maybe they really did not know any better, but by 1991 there is no excuse.
Third time for GM products!
 

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Cut the hole and save yourself the headaches... Good engineering comes from people who can look ahead to the issues that will rise up due to that engineering...Sales on the other hand will override this thinking...They don't want you to own a car for 20 plus years.
My dodge truck same thing...either take the tank out OR take the box off..It was easier to remove the box than the tank...
Coulda Shoulda Cut the hole...but didn't
 

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Just out of interest would it be possible to fit an aftermarket pump and leave the faulty pump in the tank ? or would the fuel be restricted by the old pump in some way .
 

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Discussion Starter #17
If the old pump would not be a restriction I would have just added an external pump.
Pretty certain the old pump would restrict the flow too much.
 

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Many times the line from the pump or to the pump gets a crack in it sucking or pushing air.

I have cut many access panels for many things.
My 1995 corolla has a panel from factory and when it had 225,000 miles on it the pump died.
I still have the car now with 346,000 miles on it and still has original coolant hoses and original vacuum lines.
Only line I have replaced was PCV.
I keep the engine clean and no oil on stuff especially rubber.

My Ford escort had an access panel.

I really get earked at GM and other manufactures for the stupid stunts they pulled.
 

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Cut the hole and save yourself the headaches... Good engineering comes from people who can look ahead to the issues that will rise up due to that engineering...Sales on the other hand will override this thinking...They don't want you to own a car for 20 plus years.
My dodge truck same thing...either take the tank out OR take the box off..It was easier to remove the box than the tank...
Coulda Shoulda Cut the hole...but didn't
That's what I do. Out of warranty of course.
My 90 silverado has an access hatch in the bed under the bed liner. The 96 silverado hasn't been done yet. When I have to drop that tank, that's when the hatch install will happen.
 

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My neighbors pump just went on their 2014 camaro. I couldn’t find an access plate in it. Good ol gm.
 
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