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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since my Chevelle is going to be lifted from the body to replce the floor I was thinking to replace the fuel lines. Which one do you recommend original or stainless steel?
 

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Luis, I have gone stainless on the last two restos I have done simply because I am lazy and hate maintenance..OE lines will rust if you dont take care of them/coat them. Stainless on the other hand can cause trouble with sealing. Has not happened to me but I have heard the stories..your choice.
ALbert
 

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I'd go with the SS - not that it probably "needs" it at this point, but it's something that no owner will ever have to worry about again. While you're at it, make sure you use 1/2" line to allow for any future engine combo.
 

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I just bought some CUNIFER lines here in Holland. DOn't know if your known with that?? Never read anything about it on TC or any American site..:
CU=copper
NI=nickel
FER=ferro (iron)

It's has the strength of steel but the qualities of copper, so easy to bend and flare.
 

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If they are anything like stainless brake lines, they are shiny. But not like a really polished look, just less dull if you will. I only have brake lines in stainless, not fuel lines yet.
 

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You shouldn't have any trouble with a stainless fuel line sealing since rubber hoses are used at either end. The trouble with sealing on stainless lines involves brake lines. Personally, I've never had trouble with leaking brake lines either (yet). You just have to be willing to tighten them down more than seems comfortable. You also have to have nice brass juntion blocks, one nick on the flare in a brass block and stainless won't seal worth a darn.
 

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Another vote for SS lines. I also agree with Bill Rose, make sure you have some good flare nut wrenches. I too, had some probs. with a couple of the brake lines. I had to back off a turn and retighten...TIGHT!! No more leaks and that was quite a few yrs. ago. Just take your time and be patient.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I'm completely oblivious as to how the fuel lines go throught the chassis. Is this a one piece that slides through the chassis or do they come in sections and joined by rubber? Where is it exactly that it needs to be tighten so it does not leak? Is the leaking fuel line the one from the fuel pump to the carburator?
 

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I'm completely oblivious as to how the fuel lines go throught the chassis. Is this a one piece that slides through the chassis or do they come in sections and joined by rubber? Where is it exactly that it needs to be tighten so it does not leak? Is the leaking fuel line the one from the fuel pump to the carburator?
Luis, The main fuel line(s) from the tank to the fuel pump, are one piece. It only goes thru the frame at one point, up at the engine cross member.
Then rubber hose(s) to the fuel pump. Just look under the car just behind the rt front wheel, you will see it. The fuel line does go over the frame by the rear rt wheel, but if your body is raised it will be easy to see where it goes. It's very self explanatory, if you just look at the rt frame rail which the fuel line is clamped to.
Nothing on the main fuel line has to be "real tight" That would only be where the line from carb to fuel pump attach. Also if you replace the brake lines, they are the lines which many of us meant, have to be real tight.
 

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Say Bill, I have a new SS main fuel line sitting the the garage (the only brake or fuel line left to be replaced). I haven't replaced it because it looks like a pain. Looks like the only way to do it, with body on, is to take the body bushing bolts loose on the drivers side and remove the bolts on the pass side and raise the body and take the transmission cross member off. Is that right or is it possible to squease it though there somehow?
 

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I've never tried to replace a fuel line with the body on. I've only done it as part of a chassis resto, with the body off. I know it is difficult to do with the body on, if not impossible. Trying to "squeeze" it thru the space between the frame and body depends, I quess, on how much space you have, It depends how high the body is off the frame. loosing the body bolts might work, if you can get it high enough. I would keep raising the body till you have enough room to squeeze the line thru, but keep an eye on the door/fender gaps etc,... You don't want any body/paint damage

...and yes, it would be easier to remove the trans cross member to get it above that, but may not be necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks, Bill
I will order the SS fuel line through GU on Monday.
Today I had an electrician add a 20A breaker to run my new compressor. I also ordered the "blast out of a bucket kit" from Eastwood to sand blast some parts.
 

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alhough there is nothing wrong with GU, you want to look at other options, especially with Spring around the corner (not yet here in the Midwest). shows are starting up and you may be able to get good deals for SS fuel lines and brake lines. i bought both from The Right Stuff directly at a show/swap meet. I think GU gets theirs from there as well.

I installed my SS brake lines with the body on, so it can be done.
good luck.
 
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