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Hi, I have a buddy who is willing to sell me his 396 Big Block Engine. He said to make an offer, but I don't even know where to start. The engine was originally in a Chevy Chevelle (I don't know what year), then was put in a 1965 Chevy pickup truck. He says that the engine would need to be rebuilt. I have been wanting to rebuild a 396 for a while now so that isn't a problem for me. He says that everything is stock except for the intake/carburetor/air filter. He states that the engine has never been seized to his knowledge and had it running a while back, but it was only firing on a few cylinders. He also said that the engine was a hi-pro big block. If someone could give me a rough estimate on a price that would be very helpful.

Thanks,

P.S. I have a few pictures if necessary.
 

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With it needing a rebuild, I'd offer $200. Friend or not, nobody is gonna offer more $$$ unless it's actually a factory HiPo L78 or a '65 block from a one year only Corvette. Just my 2 cents...
 

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So what all is included? Is it oil pan to air cleaner? I agree with the values already placed.
Truth is one would be better off with a 454 block. More power can be made and more easily.
 

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ya - unless it's going into an original SS396 car and you need a correct date engine, but otherwise - I would skip it and find a 454 or better yet just buy a crate motor or at least a crate shortblock.
 

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He said to make an offer
As a matter of personal policy, I don't deal with "make me an offer" people. It's on the seller to name his or her price. JMHO
 

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A few things about the 396's The early ones took a special camshaft that had an oiling groove, and also canister oil filters were used on the first few years. Definitely need the casting numbers, I'd stay clear of the ones that need the special cam, as for the canister oil filters, you can get an adapter, not sure if they still make them or not, but you can find them used.

A stock bore 396 with 4 bolt mains, can make a nice start for a build, however, there are limited pistons avail in aftermarket these days. But you can stroke them with a 4" crank and make a nice 434" out of them. The block will be cheaper than a 454 or aftermarket 4 bolt block.

There are many advantages of running a short stroke engine, lower piston speed, less friction, less oil windage issues, less stress on the parts even with higher RPM.
 

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1966 Chevelle SS396
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Man, no love of the 396 around here. :) I personally like em. No, it's not as easy to make power as a 454, but you can still make some decent power with it. And with that short stroke, you can really wind em up. If you can get it fairly cheap, I'd say grab it!
 

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A few things about the 396's The early ones took a special camshaft that had an oiling groove, and also canister oil filters were used on the first few years. Definitely need the casting numbers, I'd stay clear of the ones that need the special cam, as for the canister oil filters, you can get an adapter, not sure if they still make them or not, but you can find them used.

A stock bore 396 with 4 bolt mains, can make a nice start for a build, however, there are limited pistons avail in aftermarket these days. But you can stroke them with a 4" crank and make a nice 434" out of them. The block will be cheaper than a 454 or aftermarket 4 bolt block.

There are many advantages of running a short stroke engine, lower piston speed, less friction, less oil windage issues, less stress on the parts even with higher RPM.
Trans Dapt makes the adaptor, and you can order the cam with the groove cut in it for the early block.(y)
 

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The 396 has the canted valve heads and basically, it's a better designed engine. Keep it street, short duration cam, wide lobe separation. Quadrajet intake and carb. Stock exhaust manifolds. Keep the compression around 9 or 9.25.
 
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