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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This morning on the way to work my GEN light came on. I got to work looked and found the power wire to the Alt had fried and melted the rubber boot. When I went to pull the boot back the wire fell off. I then went and got a remaned alt from NAPA. and a connector. I installed it and then fired up the car. The light didn’t go off. I didn’t run it very long because I had to get back to work. I have a couple of questions. Is the light supposed to turn off right away or does it take awhile? Also what else might have fried or caused this problem?

The car is a 68 Chevelle with a 307 and no accessories


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Dwain

69 Chevelle Convertible
 

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dwain
yes the light should go out right away. I suppose that the voltage regulator could also be fried. They are cheap ($10.00) if you get the solid state type...available at most parts stores. Check the level of electrolyte in your battery. If its low, you could have had a stuck regulator to start with.
This is something to consider & also gets you back to the top
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rick
 

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Make sure you reconnected the blue (I think) wire on the alternator - or that it didn't also get damaged. That's the line that carries 12V back to the GEN light...or not.

The light bulb actually has 12V on both legs under normal operation. If there's 12V on both legs, it won't be lit. With the ignition switch on, but the alternator not spinning, there will only be 12V on one leg and the bulb will light. As soon as the alternator starts putting out voltage, the light goes out (almost immediately).

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Darrell Spencer
Scottsdale, Arizona
'66 El Camino
'70 Malibu
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys, you were right it was the voltage regulator. It must have been bad before because now my light are brighter than they have ever been.

One other question, what is the condenser type thing that is attached to it and would it be wise to replace it? The new voltage regulator didn't come with a replacement.
 

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Don't toss the old condensor! The proper term is capacitor--and they are hard to track down, most people don't know what the heck you are talking about. Just re-use the old one, they usually don't go bad.

What it does is cancel the reactive portion of the electromagnetic regulating relay. It prevents "spikes" caused by the inductive nature of the coil to seep back into the electrical system and be heard on your radio.

It's a noise cancelling capacitor
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks, I'll just leave it on then.
 
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