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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If you look at this gadget they're selling at http://www.wiringharness.com/images/27555.jpg to permit you to swap out the old externally regulated alternator to the internal, it appears they are using an existing wire in the external regulator connector to send 12V to the alternator terminal #2 and not jumping an additional wire from the bat post as shown in the diagram here at http://www.chevelles.com/techref/tecref14.html

Could it be as easy as jumping brown to blue (for idiot light)and the other end of the blue wire to the #1 terminal and jumping white to orange for 12V power and connecting the other end of the white wire to the #2 terminal? Orange is hot, shown connecting to the bat terminal already in the harness it appears in the wiring diagram and I believe I saw a fuseable link on it too. Anyone know if this setup works?

From looking at the adapter plug set they sell, it appears the blue wire would end up on the on the number one terminal, the white on number two. (looking at the keying notch) which would match the colors existing in the harness at the alternator end.

I'd like to know if this idea about two jumpers on the factory regulator connector would work because this would be a cleaner looking swap than tying back wires and covering empty connections in the factory connector. I don't want to cut wires or tie some back if it isn't necessary. I thought I might be able to just install male jumpers into the existing harness connector and tie everything up so it won't shake loose or short out on anything.

[This message has been edited by diana (edited 07-02-2001).]
 

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I have to ask. Besides wanting to change out the alternator, what are you looking to do? Get rid of the mechanical regulator? Put in a larger alternator? I or someone else can answer your questions but it almost sounds like you don't want to cut the harness.
I don't like cutting up harnesses myself. I went for the cleanest option. Replaced the mechanical regulator with a Wells VR715 solid state unit. Works well for me without any chopping.
 

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I believe you are correct for an SI series conversion, Wes would know for sure. The orange/red wire should be hot, it's supposed to come from the horn relay hot terminal and in effect it could serve the same purpose as the short jumper wire from the bat terminal if jumped by way of the white wire and connected to the #2 terminal. And, since it does have the fusible link, if it did short there would be some protection. What I believe Wes was after is to eliminate the excess wires.

I did the CS conversion but left all the external regulator parts/wiring in place and can easily stick a stock alternator back on if needed(like a roadside breakdown). I used a short jumper on the voltage reg. connector made with a short wire with correct spade terminals to fit the appropriate terminal in the connecter and tucked it away at the regulator, I used a plastic wire loom on the alternator harness and just folded the stock wires and connector back inside of it so its hidden neatly.



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Elcaminos are special!
I'd rather walk around with a Chevrolet hubcap in my hand than drive a Ford


work in progress
Big James Elky(AKA Ol Paint)
www.chevelles.com/showroom/workgoeson1.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
John, I just want to use the alternator my hubby has already, which is a 7127 model, but not damage the factory regulator connector to keep my options open down the road.

Big James, thanks for making me feel a little more confident about giving this idea a try tomorrow.
 

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I think you are correct. The only thing I have to question is the power requirements for the 12 volt (number 2) terminal. I've seen alternators with fairly heavy wire on this connector so it makes me wonder. It looks like they are doing it in that picture so maybe it is OK. Possible it only works for the lower output internal alternators.

I always wondered about removing the guts from the regulator and doing the connections inside the cover. That way, it would still look like origional. Using male connectors into the terminal is also a good method.

For the alternator, you can push the connectors out of the plastic holder it you push back the holding tab with something like a small pick. You just push it into one side between the connector and housing. Then, just install the new connector for the new alternator.

Peter
 

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Diana;

There are a couple companies that sell this sort of "jumper" kit and as far as I know, there isn't any "design" problem with doing it this way.

As Big James stated, when I did the converstion (and wrote the "technical reference" page), I was trying to remove as much wiring and connections as possible (and yet keep the warning light). In my mind, the less connectors the better! Particularly on an old car where stuff has seen 30 (or better) years of corrosion.

The big selling point for the "jumper" kit is that you can always revert back to stock. This is a big point with some people.

As for the idea that should you have a problem with a converted system while in some small town; it seems to me that you would just purchase a rebuilt alternator of the same type as what you put in it. You wouldn't go and revert back to the external regulator system.



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Wes. Vann
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the feedback Wes, long time no type to you! I probably won't ever go back to the other type of alternator, but in a pinch, I could use either type. I left a new Wells solid state regulator bolted on.

Anyway, this morning I jumpered out the regulator connector, the two inner wires together (white and orange) and the outer wires (blue and brown) It was a two minute job to cut a couple short lengths of wire, crimp on some male quick disconnects, plug them in the holes and tie wrap them tight to the factory connector, then attach the bundle up against the harness out of harms way with another tie wrap.

Hubby and I installed the new alternator after I did the wiring change and everything appears hunky dory so far. I didn't have a plug at the alternator, just two wires with quick disconnects, so I just had to be sure to plug the wires in correctly. A strong 14.65 volts at the battery drops to 14.53 volts with high beams on and there is no jumping on the ammeter when clicking the lights between high and low beams or turning them off and on.

When starting the car there is no more need to rev the engine to kick that alternator into charging, a key start shows a slight charge, pulls back to center and I don't see any deflection in the ammeter while gunning the engine even if the volts do climb a hair. My ammeter used to jump all over the place just driving or while idling with a little rev to the engine, it's rock steady now.

Thanks to all for your support and comments.
 
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