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no, none do unless somebody installs it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, I was just wondering. When I put my 496 together last year, I installed a flat tappet cam and never put any kind of bushing behind the cam gear.

I haven't ran it yet, and I could easily take the gear off and put one on if needed.
 

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the better gear sets usually have a thrust washer behind them-you just cant add one, unless you mill down the back of the gear, or it will stick out-good idea to have one, saves wear on the front of the block
 

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The Torrington-bearing is just another piece of nice hardware that engine and tranny builders started using anywhere one would fit. I put several of them in my Turbo 400.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
the better gear sets usually have a thrust washer behind them-you just cant add one, unless you mill down the back of the gear, or it will stick out-good idea to have one, saves wear on the front of the block

I put a Cloyes true double roller gear set on. It didn't come with a bushing or bearing. I know that they are used when using a roller cam, but I didn't know if it was a recommended item for FT camshafts.
 

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They're not required for FT or roller cams. At some point in the life of the BBC there were issues with the front of the block getting extreme wear where the timing gear rubbed on it. There was never an adequate explanation for this, seemed like a random thing to me. I've done several where the area was machined down like .150 and a .150 bronze wear plate installed, just loose as a floater. Then Cloyes and others started selling timing sets with the back of the upper gear machined down and including a wear plate. Then they started selling a machined down gear with a Torrington and two shims. If the front of the block is damaged it still needs to be machined down and a precision spacer installed to get the cam back to the proper location regardless of whether or not a Torrington is used. I've seen a couple where a guy used a Torrington and the shims for the spacer and used the stock type gear.

For whatever reason this doesn't seem to be a big or common issue anymore.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks Tom,

My block was in perfect shape. It was disassembled back in the 80's and never machined. Everything checked out when I had the machining done. I was just checking in case it was a piece that I missed when originally assembling this engine.
 
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