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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone tried Cryogenic Tempering on any of thier parts. I found a local shop that does it and I am going to look into having my rotors and some other parts done.

I just want to see if anyone has good or bad experiences.

Thanks

R.J.
 

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Heck, there's companies claiming that a Compact Disc that's been supercooled will sound better!

Mind you, I've got no direct experience!
 

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R.J.,

It is my understanding the Cryogenic Tempering is just another form of being Quenched. That is, they heat up the part, then cool it rapidly. This produces a very hard and wear resistant part. However, it parts will tend to be brittle. I wouldn't be surprised to see heat cracks on the surface of a rotor with this treatment if it's going to be on a street driven car.

If it were my car and money, I would stay away from it. Save the money you would have spent on new rotors and the tempering and by a set of high quality aftermarket rotors. That's just my 2 cents worth.

Hope it helps.
Bill

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The price of freedom is eternal vigilance.
 
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I found this on the internet and sent the company a question about brake rotors. This process is real popular in the fire arms business.

"Researchers have found that the effects of shallow cryogenic tempering (-110°F) is minimal unless it is performed as part of the initial heat treat cycle. Heat treating is what gives steel its hardness as well as its toughness, wear resistance and ductility. Even performed properly, heat treating cannot remove all of the retained austenite (large, unstable particles of carbon carbide) from a steel. Proper heat treating is a key part in increasing a parts toughness, durability, wear resistance, strength and Rockwell hardness.
The beneficial changes that occur as a result of the heat treat process do not actually take place during the heating, but, rather from the cooling or "quenching" from the high temperature. (The benefits of the quench do not stop at room temperature, as many alloys will continue to show significant improvements as the quench temperature nears absolute zero.) While it is impossible to actually achieve -459.67°F, (a molecular zero movement state that eliminates all stress), deep cryogenic tempering temperatures are very efficient and cost effective in increasing dimensional stability, increasing wear resistance and performance of most alloys."


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In the year of the motor head 1955 GM created the small block and it was good. A decade later Flint brought forth the true rats, and it was good. In 1970 they screwed the pooch with the 454. I guess two out of three ain't bad!
 

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We used this alot when I used to slot car drag race.
Sound punkey but we had cars that would go from 0-120 mph in under .450 of a second in a scale 1/4 mile, thats 55 ft.
We used it for everything from gears,bearings,bushings,plastics,magnets ect.......
What they do is deep freeze the part for 24 hrs. and bring it back to room temp over the course of a weekend and its all done very slowley. What it does is realign the molecules in the part for better wear resistance,machinabilty,electrical......
I have never seen or had a bad reaction or effect from this prosess.
Warren Johnson used it when he set the 200 mph record. Cant be bad if the professor uses it! Check out this site, you may be suprized? http://www.onecryo.com/
hope this helps?
T.C.
 
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